RIP, SLI: Nvidia GeForce RTX 30-series slams the final ...

Newegg - Update Regarding NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3080 Video Cards

Just received this email from Newegg:

Dear Customer,
Thank you for subscribing to receive an Auto Notify Email about NVIDIA RTX 3080. If you were among the hundreds of thousands who tried buying one at launch, we hope you were successful. However if you were unable to get one, we’d like to provide you with as much information as we can, as well as our plan for the rest of the RTX 30 Series launch.
Newegg released the NVIDIA RTX 3080 graphics cards on Thursday, September 17th at 6:00 am PT. We tried to procure as many cards as possible from our partners, however our inventory was very limited and far from sufficient to meet the enormity of the demand. To maintain a level playing field, we made sure our bot protection was active to help ensure all orders were placed by humans. We mandated a 1-unit-per-order limit to spread the cards to as many customers as possible, and to prevent scalpers from leveraging our site. We conducted a manual inspection of all 30 Series orders to validate our protections and are confident that cards are getting to real customers. We are also actively reporting any Newegg screenshots of orders as they appear on 3rd party marketplaces.
Due to the unprecedented amount of traffic the morning of the launch, our inventory of RTX 30 Series cards sold out in minutes. We are currently restocking our inventory as more cards come in from various manufacturers and will continue to do so on a daily/weekly basis. We cannot disclose precisely when cards will be coming in, but they will be activated on our site as we receive inventory from each manufacturer.
NVIDIA created an incredible card which has an incredible demand, and our partners have created some spectacular models with it. From previous launches to the bitcoin mining boom, we’ve seen it all and have processes in place to ensure everyone has a fighting chance to upgrade their rig or start a new build. We’re excited to see the PC community grow and are doing everything we can to procure more components for our beloved PC family.
Upcoming are two more releases: the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3090 on Sept. 24th, and the NVIDIA GeForce RTX 3070 on Oct 15th.
Keep checking the site for the 3080 cards, or if you prefer to wait for the upcoming releases instead, we’ll see you then.
Sincerely, Newegg
submitted by TaintedSquirrel to nvidia [link] [comments]

Coil Whine - Unique Situation and What I've Learned and my Desparate Need for Help.

Specs listed at the bottom before you pull your hair out and throw your chair out the window.

So for the past 2 months I have been digging all over the internet and troubleshooting this problem in every way I can conceive and I have been through quite the journey to get where I am now, only to find that I may literally be the only one suffering from my unique problem. I am going to be somewhat detailed so that anyone else suffering from this might find this post and learn something (if we find a solution).
I will try to keep it concise, but I need you all to know what I have and have not tried so that we don't waste everyone's time.
I have an audio buzz. This buzz comes primarily from analogue ins/outs on my PC's hardware. USB audio ins/outs have this as well, but not nearly as bad. I have a USB mixer that I thought was the culprit, because as I was setting up the audio system for streaming it became apparent. I initially discovered ground loops and tried to mitigate the problem by eliminating that. No dice. I systematically eliminated every single ground from the system and removed components to no avail.
It would literally be impossible for me to have a ground loop with my current setup - I really dialed that in before I moved inside the PC. Yes I have even plugged the entire system (AS A TEMPORARY - LITERALLY 30 SECOND TEST) into the outlet with no ground prong (bring on the hate) to eliminate that possibility.
The main problem that I have is due to the fact that I have to monitor "listen to this device" one input or another with the way my audio works. I need on the fly control of multiple audio streams at my mixer, so I have audio running from windows into my mixer and back out at 2 points. If I want to hear anything from one of them I MUST monitor it within windows. Monitoring the USB audio source does make things significantly more quiet than monitoring the analogue line in, so I am setup this way and things are better than they could be - but still not nearly acceptable.
Spoiler: it is due to coil whine which apparently to every single other person in the world is literally a zero issue because they can hide their PC below their desk, keep the culprit component enclosed in the case or use good headphones and not have to listen to the "hardware coil whine." Nobody hears their coil whine through their audio output. If they do - they've been searching for solutions to:
These people that are searching this DO get the help they need. They simply disable a culprit unused audio source, disable monitoring "listen to this device" on an audio source, or reduce microphone boost or lower input/output levels. Some even have success disabling or enabling drivers (but I think this is not the ACTUAL solution - I notice that when I disable, uninstall or update devices/drivers, settings roll back too and any device I was monitoring is no longer monitored (or is monitored by the wrong audio output). My theory is that drivers have nothing to do with this problem - any apparent fix or genesis of the problem due to Windows Update or Drivers are actually just settings being defaulted or change by the audio system resetting.
I have also tried USB isolation and dedicated sound cards (which just pass the problem along). The problem is exactly the same no matter what because again - this is due to coil whine and it is at the hardware level at its core.
I discovered that it was coil whine after thinking I had discovered it was not coil whine. After all - removing my GPU from the equation didn't stop the sound from persisting in my headphones and a CPU can't coil whine (I don't think)... Anyways, I happen to think I have found a workaround last night. Yeah, sure - the buzz is still there but I am pretty sure it is not coming into my stream. Wrong. I load up a game (and I have my case side panel off) and before I can get into my headphones to check if the noise is back I notice it coming from inside my PC's case.
Quick throw-on of the headphones and a quick diagnostic tells me that indeed I am hearing the same noise inside the case and through my headphones. As mentioned before - the USB monitoring has lessened the problem, but not eliminated it.
So I have a big "HELL YEAH" moment. The problem is still there - but I know it is SOMEWHERE in this chunk of hardware I am looking at in front of me, and I can assume it is either the PSU, the Motherboard or the GPU.
So I take to doing some testing. In my months of research I found that when the computer is "drawing" as in pixels are generating new information, the problem is worse. I also know that loading my CPU to 100% significantly reduces the noise it is making and again I know these things can be related to changes in voltage at the CPU/GPU.
So I get a game loaded and go to work. Unplug Display Port - nothing changes significantly, but there is a small change nonetheless. But the monitor literally isn't drawing anything. The CPU is still relaying information (mouse position, the Game, etc). So either way the GPU is still receiving information, just not passing it on to the monitor.
Pull the 8 pin off the GPU - Fan cranks to 650% and I couldn't hear anything if I tried. So no dice there but I remember trying this before and not noticing much of a change either.
So now I open performance monitor, a web page with plenty of white on it (seems to generate the most noise) and start scrolling around. I notice that I get spikes on the GPU AND THE CPU when scrolling, and the noise in the headphones and at the hardware level is consistent with the movement and the readouts in Performance Monitor.
I run Cinebench r20, the CPU shuts the F**k up for the most part, but mostly because it is a high frequency now and most of it is out of normal hearing range (I have a wider hearing range due to ear training) and can pick up the low end of it (18-19khz) and think that if only this was all I had to deal with that would be great.
However, I am still getting quick spikes (during r20 test) when I move the mouse to highlight different tables on the performance monitor - so the GPU is also in on it.
Speaking of trying to isolate hardware problems: I have tried isolating the noise in the case using a straw and a notebook to block the sound and really can't determine if it is GPU, CPU, or some component on the motherboard or all three - I know it is not coming from the PSU because that is easy enough to isolate in my case (pun not intended - but enjoyed).
However, just because the PSU does not whine doesn't mean it isn't the culprit - if it is delivering unstable power to a component then it sure could be (correct me if I am wrong).
So here I am - wondering if you all have any valuable input. Please consider that I have read (no exaggeration) 200+ unique pages on this topic (broad as it was in the beginning) and I have tried everything suggested BESIDES replacing CPU, replacing, GPU, replacing MOBO, replacing PSU.
And that is why I am here asking for your advice. I need to probably replace components and I have to start somewhere - I cannot RMA anything besides the GPU (lost all proofs of purchase - paid cash for some items at retailers and lost paperwork when moving). And MSI will not RMA motherboards for Coil Whine anyway (according to numerous posts). I am prepared to buy a new MOBO and PSU, but I wonder where you think I should start.
Nvidia is looking into RMA'ing the card for me but they're hesitant.
I just want to list some other random things I have tried with no success so that you don't waste your time having to ask.
Please let me know if you have any input or are suffering the same problem. I would really appreciate it and hopefully someone suffering a problem can find this post and learn something about their own situation from all the processing I have done.

Specs:
Thanks in advance.

Update: In case this gets read by more than 3 people. Changed MOBO and PSU (independently and together - as separate tests) and nothing has changed.
submitted by oSHTsasQuatch to techsupport [link] [comments]

Anything in my current, fairly old (but water-cooled!), PC worth using in a new one?

I started building computers around the year 2000 and have never really done a complete build from scratch (for myself) after my first. I'd upgrade a part here and there, and over time everything has been replaced multiple times. However, I'm thinking, due to an upgrade hiatus (it took me a LONG time to "beat" Skyrim :-P), I'm at the end of the road. I'm close to the conclusion that, for the second time in my life, it makes sense for a fresh new build. I figure I'd run this past y'all first.
My next computer I'll use for both fun and work. On the fun side, it would ideally play modern games (Particularly, I'm eying Elder Scrolls VI and Baldurs Gate III) on decent settings on my 34" widescreen monitor. Work-wise, it needs to be able to run multiple docker containers and let me do other things (take notes in notion, google docs, etc.) while on a CPU-crushing video call. The budget is $1,500.
Here is my current setup and thoughts on each component:
Photos: https://imgur.com/a/xyM07dx

Things that may be useful:
Operating System: Windows 10 Professional (from upgrading from Windows 7... the DVD is hopefully somewhere)
PSU: Corsair TX850W - It has been trusty for the last eight years, but may not have the needed connectors for today's stuff.
Hard Drive: Crucial MX100 512 GB SATA SSD - 2.5-Inch, No performance complaints (specs claim 6.0 Gb/s), although I'm running out of storage space.
Optical Drive: Pioneer DVD-RW - Do people still put these in new computers? I also have an external USB DVD drive I could use in a pinch.
Case: Chieftec Dragon Mid Tower - this old case is steel and heavy as shit, which is actually nice as my dogs and toddlers are unlikely to knock it over inadvertently. It has a window which I like, although cable management is a massive pain in the ass. I'm not too fond of the door that covers the buttons and optical drive and lost it long ago.
Cooling: Custom water cooling setup - I water-cooled in 2002, overclocking my Athlon XP 1700+ from 1.4Ghz to 2.5. It was awesome. The radiator and T-valve are the original gangsters. I'm on my fifth pump, with my last three being the Swiftech MCP655-B, which I like. The current water block is some D-Tek for the old CPU socket. The radiator is an old Chevy Impala radiator (I think) that this guy I met on a 3DMark (now Futuremark) forum (jb2cool?) custom modified and made a shroud that houses two 120mm fans. I had to drill the shit out of my case to mount this thing in there. I'm very nostalgic about this setup, but it would also be a huge pain to fit into a new case.
Monitor: LG 34UM67-P 34 - 34" IPS widescreen; 5ms 2560 x 1080 60hz; is 60hz too slow these days?
Keyboard and mouse: Logitech Chordless Wave - USB dongle; wrists feel ok, no complaints

Things that probably will not be useful:
Motherboard: Gigabyte P45T-ES3G - I'm pretty sure I won't be reusing this. I also bought it to replace a more bad-ass motherboard that died when my previous power supply died and took it out with it. I do like how it had dual bios, though.
CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad Q6600 - Been impressed with this CPU lasting as long as it has. I wet sanded it down to a mirror finish ready to overclock the shit out of it, but then never got to it as life got in the way.
Memory: 4x4GB PC3-12800 DDR3 - G.Skill Ripjaws; ancient technology. Note: I want more than 16GB ram in my next build.
GPU: Asus Geforce GTX 460 - My previous GTX 460 died at the height of bitcoin, and any modern GPU was stupidly expensive. Replacing mine was only $30 on eBay, so that's the route I went.

tl;dr: are any of the above bolded components still worthwhile in a modern PC build?
submitted by Zugwalt to buildapc [link] [comments]

hahhaa doom go brrrr

The date was June 10, 2018. The sun was shining, the grass was growing, and the birds were singing. At least, that’s what I assumed. Being a video game and tech obsessed teenager, I was indoors, my eyes glued to my computer monitor like a starving lion spying on a plump gazelle. I was watching the E3 (Electronic Entertainment Expo) 2018 broadcast on twitch.com, a popular streaming website. Video game developers use E3 as an annual opportunity to showcase any upcoming video game projects to the public. So far, the turnout had been disappointing. Much to my disappointment, multiple game developers failed to unveil anything of actual sustenance for an entire two hours. A graphical update here, a bug fix there. Issues that should have been fixed at every game’s initial launch, not a few months after release. Feeling hopeless, I averted my eyes from my computer monitor to check Reddit (a social media app/website) if there were any forum posts that I had yet to see. But then, I heard it. The sound of music composer Mick Gordon’s take on the original “DooM” theme, the awesome combination of metal and electronic music. I looked up at my screen and gasped. Bethesda Softworks and id software had just announced “DOOM: Eternal”, the fifth addition in the “DooM” video game series. “DOOM: Eternal” creative director Hugo Martin promised that the game would feel more powerful than it’s 2016 predecessor, there would be twice as many enemy types, and the doom community would finally get to see “hell on earth”. (Martin) As a fan of “DOOM (2016)”, I was ecstatic. The original “DooM” popularized the “First Person Shooter (FPS)” genre, and I wished I wouldn’t have to wait to experience the most recent entry in the series. “DOOM(1993)” was a graphical landmark when it originally released, yet nowadays it looks extremely dated, especially compared to “DOOM: Eternal”. What advancements in computer technology perpetuated this graphical change? Computers became faster, digital storage increased, and computer peripherals were able to display higher resolution and refresh rates.
“DooM” 1993 graphics example:
📷(Doom | Doom Wiki)
“DOOM: Eternal” graphics example:
📷
(Bailey)
In their video “Evolution Of DOOM”, the video game YouTube Channel “gameranx” says that on December 10, 1993, a file titled “DOOM1_0.zip” was uploaded on the File Transfer Protocol (FTP) server of the University of Wisconsin. This file, two megabytes in size, contained the video game “DooM” created by the game development group “id Software”. (Evolution of DOOM) While not the first game in the “First Person Shooter” (FPS) genre, “DooM” popularized the genre, to the point of any other FPS game being referred to as a “Doom Clone” until the late 1990s. (Doom clones | Doom Wiki) The graphics of the original “DooM” is definitely a major downgrade compared to today’s graphical standards, but keep in mind that the minimum system requirements of “DooM”, according to the article “Doom System Requirements” on gamesystemrequirements.com, was eight megabytes of ram, an Intel Pentium or AMD (Advanced Micro Devices) Athlon 486 processor cycling at sixty-six megahertz or more, and an operating system that was Windows 95 or above. (Doom System Requirements) In case you don’t speak the language of technology (although I hope you learn a thing or two at the end of this essay), the speed and storage capacity is laughable compared to the specifications of today. By 1993, the microprocessor, or CPU (Central Processing Unit) had been active for the past twenty-two years after replacing the integrated circuit in 1971, thanks to the creators of the microprocessor, Robert Noyce and Gordon Moore who were also the founder of CPU manufacturer “Intel”. Gordon Moore also created “Moore’s law”, which states “The number of transistors incorporated in a chip will approximately double every 24 months”. (Moore) Sadly, according to writer and computer builder Steve Blank in his article “The End of More - The Death of Moore’s Law”, this law would end at around 2005, thanks to the basic laws of physics. (Blank) 1993 also marked an important landmark for Intel, who just released the first “Pentium” processor which was capable of a base clock of 60 MHz (megahertz). The term “base clock” refers to the default speed of a CPU. This speed can be adjusted via the user’s specifications, and “MHz” refers to one million cycles per second. A cycle is essentially one or more problems that the computer solves. The more cycles the CPU is running at, the more problems get solved. Intel would continue upgrading their “Pentium” lineup until January 4, 2000 when they would release the “Celeron” processor, with a base clock of 533 MHz. Soon after, on June 19, 2000, rival CPU company AMD would release their “Duron” processor which had a base clock of 600 MHz, with a maximum clock of 1.8 GHz (Gigahertz). One GHz is equal to 1,000 MHz. Intel and AMD had established themselves as the two major CPU companies in the 1970s in Silicon Valley. Both companies had been bitter rivals since then, trading figurative blows in the form of competitive releases, discounts, and “one upmanship” to this day. Moving on to April 21, 2005 when AMD released the first dual-core CPU, the “Athlon 64 X2 3800+”. The notable feature of this CPU, besides a 2.0 GHz base clock and a 3.8 maximum clock, was that it was the first CPU to have two cores. A CPU core is a CPU’s processor. The more cores a CPU has, the more tasks it can perform per cycle, thus maximizing it’s efficiency. Intel wouldn’t respond until January 9, 2006, when they released their dual-core processor, the “Core 2 Duo Processor E6320”, with a base clock of 1.86 GHz. (Computer Processor History) According to tech entrepreneur Linus Sebastian in his YouTube videos “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2009 - 2014 (Part 1)” and “10 Years of Gaming PCs: 2015 - 2019 (Part 2)”, AMD would have the upper hand over Intel until 2011, when Intel released the “Sandy Bridge” CPU microarchitecture, which was faster and around the same price as AMD’s current competing products. (Sebastian) The article “What is Microarchitecture?” on the website Computer Hope defines microarchitecture as “a hardware implementation of an ISA (instruction set architecture). An ISA is a structure of commands and operations used by software to communicate with hardware. A microarchitecture is the hardware circuitry that implements one particular ISA”. (What is Microarchitecture?) Microarchitecture is also referred to as what generation a CPU belongs to. Intel would continue to dominate the high-end CPU market until 2019, when AMD would “dethrone” Intel with their third generation “Ryzen” CPU lineup. The most notable of which being the “Ryzen 3950x”, which had a total of sixteen cores, thirty-two threads, a base clock of 3.5 GHz, and a maximum clock of 4.7 GHz. (Sebastian) The term “thread” refers to splitting one core into virtual cores, via a process known as “simultaneous multithreading”. Simultaneous multithreading allows one core to perform two tasks at once. What CPU your computer has is extremely influential for how fast your computer can run, but for video games and other types of graphics, there is a special type of processor that is designed specifically for the task of “rendering” (displaying) and generating graphics. This processor unit is known as the graphics processing unit, or “GPU”. The term “GPU” wasn’t used until around 1999, when video cards started to evolve beyond the literal generation of two-dimensional graphics and into the generation of three-dimensional graphics. According to user “Olena” in their article “A Brief History of GPU”, The first GPU was the “GeForce 256”, created by GPU company “Nvidia'' in 1999. Nvidia promoted the GeForce 256 as “A single-chip processor with integrated transform, lighting, triangle setup/clipping, and rendering engines that is capable of processing a minimum of 10 million polygons per second”. (Olena) Unlike the evolution of CPUs, the history of GPUs is more one sided, with AMD playing a game of “catchup” ever since Nvidia overtook AMD in the high-end GPU market in 2013. (Sebastian) Fun fact, GPUs aren’t used only for gaming! In 2010, Nvidia collaborated with Audi to power the dashboards and increase the entertainment and navigation systems in Audi’s cars! (Olena) Much to my (and many other tech enthusiasts), GPUs would increase dramatically in price thanks to the “bitcoin mania” around 2017. This was, according to senior editor Tom Warren in his article “Bitcoin Mania is Hurting PC Gamers By Pushing Up GPU Prices'' on theverge.com, around an 80% increase in price for the same GPU due to stock shortages. (Warren) Just for context, Nvidia’s “flagship” gpu in 2017 was the 1080ti, the finest card of the “pascal” microarchitecture. Fun fact, I have this card. The 1080ti launched for $699, with the specifications of a base clock of 1,481 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,582 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR5X Vram (Memory that is exclusive to the GPU) according to the box it came in. Compare this to Nvidia’s most recent flagship GPU, the 2080ti of Nvidia’s followup “Turing” microarchitecture, another card I have. This GPU launched in 2019 for $1,199. The 2080ti’s specifications, according to the box it came in included a base clock of 1,350 MHz, a maximum clock of 1,545 MHz, and 11 gigabytes of GDDR6 Vram.
A major reason why “DooM” was so popular and genius was how id software developer John Carmack managed to “fake” the three-dimensional graphics without taking up too much processing power, hard drive space, or “RAM” (Random access memory), a specific type of digital storage. According to the article “RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition” on the website TechTerms, Ram is also known as “volatile” memory, because it is much faster than normal storage (which at the time took the form of hard-drive space), and unlike normal storage, only holds data when the computer is turned on. A commonly used analogy is that Ram is the computer’s short-term memory, storing temporary files to be used by programs, while hard-drive storage is the computer’s long term memory. (RAM (Random Access Memory) Definition) As I stated earlier, in 1993, “DooM” required 8 megabytes of ram to run. For some context, as of 2020, “DOOM: Eternal” requires a minimum of 8 gigabytes of DDR4 (more on this later) ram to run, with most gaming machines possessing 16 gigabytes of DDR4 ram. According to tech journalist Scott Thornton in his article “What is DDR (Double Data Rate) Memory and SDRAM Memory”, in 1993, the popular format of ram was “SDRAM”. “SDRAM” stands for “Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory”. SDRAM differs from its predecessor, “DRAM” (Dynamic Random Access Memory) by being synchronized with the clock speed of the CPU. DRAM was asynchronous (not synchronized by any external influence), which “posted a problem in organizing data as it comes in so it can be queued for the process it’s associated with”. SDRAM was able to transfer data one time per clock cycle, and it’s replacement in the early 2000s, “DDR SDRAM” (Dual Data Rate Synchronous Dynamic Random Access Memory) was able to transfer data two times per clock cycle. This evolution of ram would continue to this day. In 2003, DDR2 SDRAM was released, able to transfer four pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2007, DDR3 SDRAM was able to transfer eight pieces of data per clock cycle. In 2014, DDR4 SDRAM still was able to transfer eight pieces of data per cycle, but the clock speed had increased by 600 MHz, and the overall power consumption had been reduced from 3.3 volts for the original SDRAM to 1.2 volts for DDR4. (Thornton)The digital size of each “ram stick” (a physical stick of ram that you would insert into your computer) had also increased, from around two megabytes per stick, to up to 128 gigabytes per stick (although this particular option will cost you around $1,000 per stick depending on the manufacturer) in 2020, although the average stick size is 8 gigabytes. For the average computer nowadays, you can insert up to four ram sticks, although for more high-end systems, you can insert up to sixteen or even thirty-two! Rewind back to 1993, where the original “DooM” took up two megabytes of storage, not to be confused with ram. According to tech enthusiast Rex Farrance in their article “Timeline: 50 Years of Hard Drives”, the average computer at this time had around two gigabytes of storage. Storage took the form of magnetic-optical discs, a combination of the previous magnetic discs and optical discs. (Farrance) This format of storage is still in use today, although mainly for large amounts of rarely used data, while data that is commonly used by programs (including the operating system) is put on solid-state drives, or SSDs. According to tech journalist Keith Foote in their article “A Brief History of Data Storage”, SSDs differed from the HDD by being much faster and smaller, storing data on a flash memory chip, not unlike a USB thumb drive. While SSDs had been used as far back as 1950, they wouldn’t find their way into the average gaming machine until the early 2010s. (Foote) A way to think about SSDs is common knowledge. It doesn’t contain every piece of information you know, it just contains what you use on a daily basis. For example, my computer has around 750 gigabytes of storage in SSDs, and around two terabytes of internal HDD storage. On my SSDs, I have my operating system, my favorite programs and games, and any files that I use frequently. On my HDD, I have everything else that I don’t use on a regular basis.
“DOOM: Eternal” would release on March 20, 2020, four months after it’s original release date on November 22, 2019. And let me tell you, I was excited. The second my clock turned from 11:59 P.M. to 12:00 A.M., I repeatedly clicked my refresh button, desperately waiting to see the words “Coming March 20” transform into the ever so beautiful and elegant phrase: “Download Now”. At this point in time, I had a monitor that was capable of displaying roughly two-million pixels spread out over it’s 27 inch display panel, at a rate of 240 times a second. Speaking of monitors and displays, according to the article “The Evolution of the Monitor” on the website PCR, at the time of the original “DooM” release, the average monitor was either a CRT (cathode ray tube) monitor, or the newer (and more expensive) LCD (liquid crystal display) monitor. The CRT monitor was first unveiled in 1897 by the German physicist Karl Ferdinand Braun. CRT monitors functioned by colored cathode ray tubes generating an image on a phosphorescent screen. These monitors would have an average resolution of 800 by 600 pixels and a refresh rate of around 30 frames per second. CRT monitors would eventually be replaced by LCD monitors in the late 2000s. LCD monitors functioned by using two pieces of polarized glass with liquid crystal between them. A backlight would shine through the first piece of polarized glass (also known as substrate). Electrical currents would then cause the liquid crystals to adjust how much light passes through to the second substrate, which creates the images that are displayed. (The Evolution of the Monitor) The average resolution would increase to 1920x1080 pixels and the refresh rate would increase to 60 frames a second around 2010. Nowadays, there are high end monitors that are capable of displaying up to 7,680 by 4,320 pixels, and also monitors that are capable of displaying up to 360 frames per second, assuming you have around $1,000 lying around.
At long last, it had finished. My 40.02 gigabyte download of “DOOM: Eternal” had finally completed, and oh boy, I was ready to experience this. I ran over to my computer, my beautiful creation sporting 32 gigs of DDR4 ram, an AMD Ryzen 7 “3800x” with a base clock of 3.8 GHz, an Nvidia 2080ti, 750 gigabytes of SSD storage and two terabytes of HDD storage. Finally, after two years of waiting for this, I grabbed my mouse, and moved my cursor over that gorgeous button titled “Launch DOOM: Eternal”. Thanks to multiple advancements in the speed of CPUs, the size of ram and storage, and display resolution and refresh rate, “DooM” had evolved from an archaic, pixelated video game in 1993 into the beautiful, realistic and smooth video game it is today. And personally, I can’t wait to see what the future has in store for us.
submitted by Voxel225 to voxelists [link] [comments]

How much would a Bitcoin node handling 1GB blocks cost today? I did some back-on-the-envelope calculations.

1GB blocks would be able to confirm more than 5000tx/s. That would be VISA-level scale (which handles, on average, 1736tx/s). We often hear that we shouldn't raise the blocksize because then nodes would become too expensive to run. But how expensive exactly?
We have the following costs to take into account:
For now, I'm going to assume a non-pruned full node (i.e. a node that stores all transactions of the blockchain) for personal use, i.e. for a computer built at home. I'll add in the calculations for a pruned node at the end, which would likely be the prefered option for people who merely want to verify the blockchain for themselves. If you don't care about the assumptions and calculations, you can just jump right to the end of this post. If you spotted any error, please inform me and I'll update my calculation.

Storage

There's, on average, one block every 10 minutes, that is 144 every day and 4320 blocks every thirty days. I was able to find a 3TB HDD for $47,50 on Amazon, that is $0.018/GB. Storing all blocks with all transactions of a month (4320GB) would be $78.96/mo. Prices for storage halved from 2014 to 2017, so we can assume that to half in 2022, thus we can reasonably assume it'd cost around $40/mo. in 2022.
But would such an inexpensive hard disk be able to keep up with writing all the data? I found a comparable cheap HDD which can write 127MB/s sequentially (which would be the writing mode of Bitcoin). That would be enough even for 76GB blocks!
Edit: For the UTXO set, we need very fast storage for both reading and writing. Peter__R, in his comment below, estimates this to be 1TB for 4 billion users (which would make ~46,000tx/s if everyone would make 1tx/day, so id'd require about 10GB blocks). jtoomim seems more pessimistic on that front, he says that much of that has to be in RAM. I'll add the $315 I've calculated below to account for that (which would be rather optimistic, keep in mind).

Bandwidth

Bandwidth is more complicated, because that can't just be shipped around like HDDs. I'll just take prices for my country, Germany, using the provider T-online, because I don't know how it works in the US. You can plug in your own numbers based on the calculations below.
1GB blocks/10 minute mean 1.7MB/s. However, this is an average, and we need some wiggle room for transaction spikes, for example at Christmas or Black Friday. VISA handles 150 million transactions per day, that is 1736tx/s, but can handle up to 24,000tx/s (source). So we should be able to handle 13.8x the average throughput, which would be 1.7MB/s x 13.8 = 23.46M/s, or 187.68Mbit/s. The plan on T-online for 250Mbit/s (translated) would be 54.95€/mo (plus setup minus a discount for the first 6 months which seems to cancel out so we'll ignore it), which would be $61.78/mo. This plan is an actual flatrate, so we don't have to worry about hitting any download limit.
Note, however, that we don't order bandwidth for only our Bitcoin node, but also for personal use. If we only needed 2MB/s for personal use, the plan would be 34.95€, thus our node would actually only cost the difference of 20€ per month, or $22.50/mo. Nielsen's Law of Internet Bandwidth claims that a high-end user's connection speed grows by 50% per year. If we assume this is true for pricing too, the bandwidth cost for ~200Mbit/s/mo. would go down to 12.5% (forgot how exponential growth works) 29.6% of its today's cost by 2022, which decreases our number to $2.81/mo. $6.66/mo.
Edit: jtoomim, markblundeberg and CaptainPatent point out that the node would have a much higher bandwidth for announcing transactions and uploading historical blocks. In theory, it would not be necessary to do any of those things and still be able to verify one's own transactions, by never broadcasting any transactions. That would be quite leechy behaviour, though. If we were to pick a higher data plan to get 1000MBit/s downstream and 500MBit/s upstream, it would cost 119.95€/mo., however this plan isn't widely available yet (both links in German). 500MBit/s of upstream would give us max. 21 connected nodes at transaction spikes, or max. 294 connected nodes at average load. That would cost $39.85 in 2022 (with correct exponential growth).

CPU/Memory

CPU/Memory will be bought once and can then run for tens of years, so we'll count these as setup costs. The specs needed, of course, depend on the optimization of the node software, but we'll assume the current bottlenecks will have been removed once running a node actually becomes demanding hardware-wise.
This paper establishes that a 2.4GHz Intel Westmere (Xeon E5620) CPU can verify 71000 signatures per second... which can be bought for $32.88 a pair on Ebay (note: this CPU is from Q1'10). We'd need to verify 76659tx/s at spikes (taking the 13.8x number), so that pair of CPUs (handle 142,000tx/s) seem to just fit right in (given one signature per tx). We'd also have to account for multiple signatures per transaction and all the other parts of verification of transactions, but it seems like the CPU costs are neglegible anyway if we don't buy the freshest hardware available. ~$100 at current prices seem reasonable. Given Moore's Law, we can assume that prices for CPUs half every two years (transistor count x1.4162), so in three years, the CPU(s) should cost around $35.22 ($100/1.4163).
For memory, we again have to take into account the transaction spikes. If we're very unlucky, and transactions spike and there won't be a block for ~1h, the mempool can become very large. If we take the factor of 13.8x from above, and 1h of unconfirmed transactions (20,000,000tx usually, 276,000,000tx on spikes), we'd need 82.8GB (for 300B per transaction).
I found 32GB of RAM (with ECC) for $106, so three of those give us 96GB of RAM for $318 and plenty remaining space for building hash trees, connection management and the operating system. Buying used hardware doesn't seem to decrease the cost significantly (we actually do need a lot of RAM, compared to CPU power).
Price of RAM seems to decrease by a factor of x100 every 10 years (x1.58510), so we can expect 96GB to cost around $79.89 ($318/1.5853) in 2022.
Of course, CPU and memory need to be compatible, which I haven't taken into account. Chug a mainboard (~$150) and a power supply (~$50) into the mix, and the total would be just over $600 for today's prices. Even if mainboard and power supply prices remain the same, we'd still only have to pay around $315 for the whole setup in 2022.

Electricity

I found the following power consumptions:
So we'd have 129W 147.6W + N*6W. Electricity cost average at 12ct/kWh in the US, in Germany this is higher at 30.22ct/kWh. In the US, it would cost $11.14 $12.75 + N*$0.52 (P*12ct/kWh / 1000 * 24h/day *30days / 100ct/$), in Germany 28.06€ 32.11€ + N*1.30€.
At the end of the first year, it would cost $20.12 $21.73/mo. in the US and 50.52€ 54.57€/mo. in Germany.
At the end of the second year, it would cost $29.11 $30.72/mo. for the US and 72.98€ 77.03€/mo. for Germany. It increases by $8.98/mo. per year in the US and by 22.46€/mo. per year in Germany.
Electricity prices in Germany have increased over time due to increased taxation; in the US the price increase has been below inflation rate the last two decades. As it's difficult to predict price changes here, I'm going to assume prices will remain the same.

Conclusion

In summary, we get:
If we add everything up, for today's prices, we get (E: updated all following numbers, but only changed slightly) $132/mo. (US), $187/mo. (DE) for the second year and $71.92/mo. $78/mo. (US), $115.79/mo. $124/mo. (DE) in 2022.
It definitely is quite a bit of money, but consider what that machine would actually do; it would basically do the equivalent of VISA's payment verification multiple times over, which is an amazing feat. Also, piano lessons cost around $50-$100 each, so if we consider a Bitcoin hobbyist, he would still pay much less for his hobby than a piano player, who'd pay about $400 per month. So it's entirely reasonable to assume that even if we had 1GB blocks, there would still be lots of people running full-nodes just so.
How about pruned nodes? Here, we only have to store the Unspent Transaction Output Set (UTXO set), which currently clocks in at 2.8GB. If blocks get 1000 times bigger, we can assume the UTXO set to become 2.8TB. I'll assume ordinary HDD's aren't goint to cut it for reading/writing the UTXO set at that scale, so we'll take some NVMe SSDs for that, currently priced at $105/TB. Three of them would increase our setup by $315 to $915, but decrease our monthly costs. E: However this UTXO set is also required for the non-pruned node, therefore the setup costs stay at $915. Even in the highest power state, the 3 SSDs will need only 18.6W in total, so we'll get a constant 147.6W for the whole system.
In total, this is:
In total, this is $35.25/mo. in the US and $58.57/mo. in Germany for today's prices, or (E:) $19.41/mo. (US) and (E:) $42.73/mo. (DE) in 2022's prices. Which looks very affordable even for a non-hobbyist.
E: spelling
E²: I've added the 3 NVEe SSDs for the UTXO set, as pointed out by others and fixed an error with exponentials, as I figured out.
submitted by eyeofpython to btc [link] [comments]

With the pretty awesome rise of almost all crypto currencies, it's time to restart our machines and mine the most profitable coin today 30.01.2020!!!

So let's talk about the GPUs to start with, the ranking has radically changed and even those that were running at a loss have become profitable again The top 10 chart:
1.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 Ti 4.60 Mh/s 220W $1.35 $0.55 Zcoin(XZC) MTP Algo
2.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2080 4.00 Mh/s 190W $1.17 $0.48 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
3.AMD Radeon VII 78.00 Mh/s 230W $1.22 $0.39 EthereumClassic(ETC) Ethash Algo
4.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 Ti 3.60 Mh/s 190W $1.05 $0.37 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
5.AMD Radeon RX 5700 XT 51.50 Mh/s 140W $0.81 $0.30 EthereumClassic(ETC) Ethash
6.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2060 2.60 Mh/s 130W $0.76 $0.29 Zcoin(XZC)MTP
7.NVIDIA GeForce RTX 2070 2.80 Mh/s 150W $0.82 $0.28 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
8.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1080 2.80 Mh/s 150W $0.82 $0.28 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
9.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1070 Ti 2.50 Mh/s 130W $0.73 $0.26 Zcoin(XZC) MTP
10.NVIDIA GeForce GTX 1660 Ti 2.00 Mh/s 100W $0.59 $0.22 Zcoin(XZC)
Now let's go to the asic Top 10:
  1. Innosilicon A10 ETHMaster 500.00 Mh/s 750W Ethash $5.13 EthereumClassic(ETC) Ethash
  2. Bitmain Antminer Z11 135.00 kh/s 1418W Equihash $3.45 Pirate(ARRR)
  3. BlackMiner F1+ 22.00 Gh/s 860W Eaglesong $3.23 Nervos(CKB) FPGAminer
4.Bitmain Antminer B7 96.00 kh/s 528W Tensority $1.87
5.Bitmain Antminer S17+ 73.00 Th/s 2920W SHA-256 $1.67 BitcoinSV(BSV)
6.StrongU STU-U6 420.00 Gh/s 2100W X11 $1.52 Dash(DASH)
  1. Bitmain Antminer S17 Pro 56 Th/s 2212W SHA-256 $1.46 BitcoinSV(BSV)
  2. Bitmain Antminer S17 59.00 Th/s 2385W SHA-256 $1.34 BitcoinSV(BSV)
  3. Innosilicon A9 ZMaster 50.00 kh/s 620W Equihash $1.08 Pirate(ARRR)
  4. FusionSilicon X7 262.00 Gh/s 1300W X11 $1.03 Dash(DASH)
Dont forget you can find around new Firmware for example for Z9/Z11 Efudd Firmware,and Hive OS firmwares which can Overclock S9/S15/S17 or Underclock (if your electriciy fee are too expensive), for example my S17 Pro I switched to new firmware (Hive OS) to 36Th/s with 900 Watts power gives me a 2.90 usd/day profit without electricity of course, for Z11 Overclocking without changing PSU from 135 to 150-160Ko/sol.
I calculated everything on the basis of 0.15 cens Kw / h.
Brand New Miner coming out:
ASICminer Zeon Turbo 400,000 Sol/s Equihash
Most Profitable Miner in the World. ASICminer Daily Revenue: $27 $16 (less 0.15 Kw/h fee) ASICminer Power Consumption: 2500W
asicminer dot co/shop (Factory)
submitted by pushingworld77 to BitcoinMining [link] [comments]

[H] Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2019 NVIDIA code [W] 22 TF keys / 19 CS GO keys / 34.5 USD / 30 EUR

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2019 (EU / Battle.net)
22 TF keys / 19 CS GO keys / 34.5 USD / 30 EUR
Keys from Nvidia promo: https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/campaigns/call-of-duty-modern-warfare-bundle/
To redeem your promotional code for Call of Duty®: Modern Warfare®, please follow the steps below:
  1. Install the RTX series graphics card
  2. Update to the latest version or install GeForce Experience.
  3. Open the GeForce Experience app and sign in to your account.
  4. Open the drop-down menu in the upper right corner and click the "activate" button»
  5. Enter the gift code you received with your purchase.
<<< ONLY FOR GEFORCE RTX CARD USERS >>>
My post on Steamtraders: https://www.steamtrades.com/trade/ju8kP/h-call-of-duty-modern-warfare-2019-nvidia-code-w-25-tf-keys-23-cs-go-keys-40-usd
Buy via PayU/Visa/MasterCard/Maestro/MIBitcoin/Alipay/Unionpay : https://www.plati.market/itm/call-of-duty-modern-warfare-2019-nvidia-key-eu/2725486
submitted by Dreamwalker83 to GameTrade [link] [comments]

Continuous Pool Disconnection & 0 Mh/s Speeds

What's up internet/fellow miners. About a week ago I've made the decision to turn my gaming PC to a mining rig. I've had some success solo mining with nicehashminer (Bitcoin miner) but decided that it would be better to mine Ethereum. I've followed the guide and kept coming across these issues. . . I don't know if it's because my config files are whack or another underlying issue.
(EDIT) Connected to us1.ethermine.org:4444 now i'm getting different issues. Here are my most recent logs.
11:11:21:867 c20 args: -epool us1.ethermine.org:4444 -ewal 0x390C9630e0672Eb1DD15D2Eb3891B07069e6c6F2.lightsdriftminer -epsw x 11:11:21:869 c20 11:11:21:878 c20 ÉÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍ» 11:11:21:883 c20 º Claymore's Dual GPU Miner - v14.7 º 11:11:21:894 c20 º ETH + DCSIA/LBC/PASC/BLAKE2S/KECCAK º 11:11:21:896 c20 º Supercharged Edition º 11:11:21:899 c20 ÈÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍÍͼ 11:11:21:912 c20 11:11:21:914 c20 b745 11:11:22:117 c20 ETH: 2 pools are specified 11:11:22:125 c20 Main Ethereum pool is us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:22:128 c20 DCR: 0 pool is specified 11:11:22:200 c20 OpenCL platform: NVIDIA CUDA 11:11:22:201 c20 AMD OpenCL platform not found 11:11:22:441 c20 CUDA initializing...
11:11:22:442 c20 NVIDIA Cards available: 1 11:11:22:443 c20 CUDA Driver Version/Runtime Version: 10.2/8.0 11:11:22:444 c20 GPU #0: GeForce GTX 960, 4096 MB available, 8 compute units, capability: 5.2 (pci bus 1:0:0) 11:11:22:445 c20 Total cards: 1 11:11:26:468 c20 NVML version: 10.430.86 11:11:27:273 c20 SSL: Imported 60 certificates from local storage 11:11:27:308 33f8 ETH: Stratum - connecting to 'us1.ethermine.org' <172.65.218.238> port 4444 (unsecure) 11:11:27:331 33f8 sent: {"worker": "eth1.0", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": ["0x390C9630e0672Eb1DD15D2Eb3891B07069e6c6F2.lightsdriftminer", "x"], "id": 2, "method": "eth_submitLogin"}
11:11:27:332 33f8 ETH: Stratum - Connected (us1.ethermine.org:4444) (unsecure) 11:11:27:375 c20 No pool specified for Decred! Ethereum-only mining mode is enabled
11:11:27:383 c20 ETHEREUM-ONLY MINING MODE ENABLED (-mode 1)
11:11:27:385 c20 ETH: eth-proxy stratum mode 11:11:27:386 c20 Watchdog enabled 11:11:27:388 c20 Remote management (READ-ONLY MODE) is enabled on port 3333 11:11:27:397 c20
11:11:27:404 33f8 buf: {"id":2,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":true}
11:11:27:405 33f8 ETH: Authorized 11:11:27:412 33f8 sent: {"worker": "", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": [], "id": 3, "method": "eth_getWork"}
11:11:27:468 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xa4dc2ea0667952442926fb027314fd0cd783cb300063809c3ce279d84884953f","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df052"]}
11:11:27:505 1cf8 Setting DAG epoch #275... 11:11:29:851 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xb34311e461aeedbc6e19ff26eb477bb24241f67c6fcca04ae0ce5c9ea9416c9b","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df052"]}
11:11:29:852 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:29 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:29:853 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:29:855 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:29:856 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:30:189 1cf8 Setting DAG epoch #275 for GPU0 11:11:30:192 1cf8 Create GPU buffer for GPU0 11:11:33:056 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x246dfc2d4c7299214c5bff6890eaec46e95326f10a0f7778a2c3711893fc20eb","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:33:058 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:33 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:33:060 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:33:067 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:33:070 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:33:114 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xffd191ec99473ea193905f976655434dc56a0818a92e0bc3f49759df4ce6a428","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:33:116 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:33 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:33:118 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:33:125 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:33:128 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:37:182 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xa9a3b30ea8bb6f0f46147809276667bd3d72f0f54efab024a1014c5f3a2d2da5","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:37:184 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:37 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:37:186 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:37:193 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:37:259 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:37:472 33f8 ETH: checking pool connection... 11:11:37:474 33f8 sent: {"worker": "", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": [], "id": 3, "method": "eth_getWork"}
11:11:37:515 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xa9a3b30ea8bb6f0f46147809276667bd3d72f0f54efab024a1014c5f3a2d2da5","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:41:214 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x08148d13c03fc8be24926cf555957aa73eebaa6fb9a0f7bc802f2e4a59b27508","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:41:216 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:41 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:41:218 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:41:225 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:41:247 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:45:196 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x7ce7a4c8ff23af05ae5b2a100b57a704d55f0ba2b7f57e4f4d96e8115b643c5d","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:45:198 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:45 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:45:200 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:45:208 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:45:211 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:47:486 33f8 ETH: checking pool connection... 11:11:47:488 33f8 sent: {"worker": "", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": [], "id": 3, "method": "eth_getWork"}
11:11:47:529 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x7ce7a4c8ff23af05ae5b2a100b57a704d55f0ba2b7f57e4f4d96e8115b643c5d","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:49:322 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x126f150e00540173459de4712848eeb5993cf40f015de6bef8e1b921b0ab1014","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df053"]}
11:11:49:324 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:49 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:49:326 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:49:334 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:49:337 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:49:676 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x998033b4ddf28107f5b4d5e55b2d4cdf1ca5206ad5d1b0eacbf4a4a33e04c796","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df054"]}
11:11:49:677 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:49 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:49:678 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:49:682 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:49:684 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:49:794 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xc29af38a326413d6ccee7806a33d6af54eb6118d2035c9f5e1e042cf355d61fa","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df054"]}
11:11:49:796 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:49 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:49:798 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:49:805 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:49:983 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:51:336 1cf8 GPU0 DAG creation time - 20882 ms 11:11:51:339 1cf8 Setting DAG epoch #275 for GPU0 done 11:11:52:152 2664 GPU0 t=48C fan=45% P=45W 11:11:52:162 2664 Total GPUs power consumption: 45 Watts 11:11:52:404 3344 em hbt: 0, fm hbt: 78, 11:11:52:406 3344 watchdog - thread 0 (gpu0), hb time 1063 11:11:52:407 3344 watchdog - thread 1 (gpu0), hb time 1063 11:11:53:742 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xff392982f7826cc5d2c866c6e29cb156157adfb9390f546cabea7c37522410e1","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df054"]}
11:11:53:744 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:53 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:53:746 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:53:753 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:55:069 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:55:350 1cf8 GPU 0, GpuMiner cu_k1 failed 30, unknown error 11:11:55:353 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:11:55:361 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:11:55:363 1cf8 GPU 0, GpuMiner kx failed 1 11:11:55:369 1cf8 Set global fail flag, failed GPU0 11:11:55:410 1cf8 GPU 0 failed 11:11:55:424 37fc GPU 0, GpuMiner cu_k1 failed 30, unknown error 11:11:55:432 37fc GPU 0, GpuMiner kx failed 1 11:11:55:436 37fc Set global fail flag, failed GPU0 11:11:55:440 37fc GPU 0 failed 11:11:57:502 33f8 ETH: checking pool connection... 11:11:57:504 33f8 sent: {"worker": "", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": [], "id": 3, "method": "eth_getWork"}
11:11:57:542 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xff392982f7826cc5d2c866c6e29cb156157adfb9390f546cabea7c37522410e1","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df054"]}
11:11:57:660 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x787a852f5ac545481815d71276fd0a24414e57d78626b67cb3cb9ba02cf4d0aa","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df054"]}
11:11:57:662 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:11:57 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:11:57:664 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:11:57:672 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:11:57:675 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:11:58:418 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:11:58:429 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:00:381 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xd9a845fe323638bbfc0901441a5959e6f2e73b625dda369cc55a51d855896e03","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df055"]}
11:12:00:382 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:00 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:00:383 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:00:388 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:00:391 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:00:490 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x4302100500931a1c914b488a598d8737ff3edbf3f3633468314d6c4e28dab922","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df055"]}
11:12:00:491 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:00 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:00:492 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:00:497 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:00:498 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:01:488 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:01:500 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:04:502 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xde108059f93a8a4ea034bb5febc5150be8e60ae89581d5ff7d41bd418c8cb815","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df055"]}
11:12:04:504 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:04 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:04:506 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:04:514 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:04:518 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:04:557 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:04:569 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:07:486 33f8 sent: {"id":6,"jsonrpc":"2.0","method":"eth_submitHashrate","params":["0x0", "0x00000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000000b5f052d5"]}
11:12:07:518 33f8 ETH: checking pool connection... 11:12:07:519 33f8 sent: {"worker": "", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": [], "id": 3, "method": "eth_getWork"}
11:12:07:525 33f8 buf: {"id":6,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":true}
11:12:07:558 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xde108059f93a8a4ea034bb5febc5150be8e60ae89581d5ff7d41bd418c8cb815","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df055"]}
11:12:07:626 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:07:638 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:08:620 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x25869655f7de1b4af101faf41f51e59fa600e7fea8b139c90dbcfaa55b6c9fb6","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df055"]}
11:12:08:622 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:08 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:08:624 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:08:634 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:08:637 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:10:592 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x31c0d6df2259de2b9db8cecd3ae97eadb63342697df59490297136aa71c2ac8d","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df056"]}
11:12:10:594 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:10 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:10:596 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:10:604 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:10:607 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:10:696 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:10:706 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:10:768 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x428bacd8f4c294dccc3870b0402b8ea1ba9a5b578ef42309a312ea78e37e7ae4","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df056"]}
11:12:10:769 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:10 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:10:770 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:10:775 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:10:777 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:11:654 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xf9a5e3322470de0aca5def6fbfa5c559e350f580687ec91f6c452e693b64084e","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df057"]}
11:12:11:656 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:11 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:11:658 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:11:676 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:11:679 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:11:754 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x77acbeb5ef7ac259f42365da8bc180d934d14d7e61514475e431a74bb33092e8","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df057"]}
11:12:11:755 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:11 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:11:756 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:11:761 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:11:763 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:13:764 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:13:767 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:15:902 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x61c461dc5d400f04c95e7af0113e2be581749c3aef0a73e79f615657bf79a17d","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df057"]}
11:12:15:904 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:15 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:15:906 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:15:914 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:15:917 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:16:823 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:16:835 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:17:534 33f8 ETH: checking pool connection... 11:12:17:536 33f8 sent: {"worker": "", "jsonrpc": "2.0", "params": [], "id": 3, "method": "eth_getWork"}
11:12:17:575 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0x61c461dc5d400f04c95e7af0113e2be581749c3aef0a73e79f615657bf79a17d","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df057"]}
11:12:19:862 33f8 buf: {"id":0,"jsonrpc":"2.0","result":["0xac10bfccd03a5ada731630cbccba3733cfbccfecc5b9f531c6373ccd47cf9e71","0x05a66c07931e801a56d8e423677f6ff2ff4814d538d377e1253810b3520f97c9","0x0000000112e0be826d694b2e62d01511f12a6061fbaec8bc02357593e70e52ba","0x7df057"]}
11:12:19:864 33f8 ETH: 07/30/19-11:12:19 - New job from us1.ethermine.org:4444 11:12:19:866 33f8 target: 0x0000000112e0be82 (diff: 4000MH), epoch 275(3.15GB) 11:12:19:873 33f8 ETH - Total Speed: 0.000 Mh/s, Total Shares: 0, Rejected: 0, Time: 00:00 11:12:19:876 33f8 ETH: GPU0 0.000 Mh/s 11:12:19:893 2664 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:19:903 2664 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:22:679 3344 em hbt: 0, fm hbt: 63, 11:12:22:680 3344 watchdog - thread 0 (gpu0), hb time 31344 11:12:22:682 3344 watchdog - thread 1 (gpu0), hb time 27281 11:12:22:684 3344 WATCHDOG: GPU error, you need to restart miner :( 11:12:22:759 11f8 NVML: cannot get current temperature, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:22:770 11f8 NVML: cannot get fan speed, error 999 (an internal driver error occurred) 11:12:24:035 3344 Restarting OK, exit...
Config File.txt -

WARNING! Remove "#" characters to enable lines, with "#" they are disabled and will be ignored by miner! Check README for details.

WARNING! Miner loads options from this file only if there are not any options in the command line!

-epool us1.ethermine.org:4444 -ewal 0x390C9630e0672Eb1DD15D2Eb3891B07069e6c6F2.lightsdriftminer -epsw x

-dpool stratum+tcp://yiimp.ccminer.org:4252

-dwal DsUt9QagrYLvSkJHXCvhfiZHKafVtzd7Sq4

-dpsw x

-esm 1 -mode 0 -tt 70 -asm 0
epool file.txt-

WARNING! Remove "#" characters to enable lines, with "#" they are disabled and will be ignored by miner! Check README for details.

POOL: eth-eu.dwarfpool.com:8008, WALLET: 0xD69af2A796A737A103F12d2f0BCC563a13900E6F/YourWorker, PSW: x, ESM: 0, ALLPOOLS: 0

POOL: us1.ethermine.org:4444, WALLET: 0x390C9630e0672Eb1DD15D2Eb3891B07069e6c6F2.lightsdriftminer, PSW: x, ESM: 1, ALLPOOLS: 0

POOL: coinotron.com:3344, WALLET: YourUserName.YourWorkerName, PSW: YourWorkerPass, WORKER: , ESM: 2, ALLPOOLS: 1, ESTALE: 1

POOL: us-east1.ethereum.miningpoolhub.com:20535, WALLET: YourLogin.YourWorkerName, PSW: YourWorkerPass, WORKER: YourLogin.YourWorkerName, ESM: 2

ANY HELP/GUIDANCE IS APPRECIATED
submitted by FlawlessPig to EtherMining [link] [comments]

A story from a cloaky camper and an attempt to build a beast mode multi-boxing server.

21/04/2018
Hello Nerds!
 
Some of you may know me, some may not. Those that do will know I offer cloaky camping services over new eden. I do camping contracts / extort renters and focus my time hunting botters when the contracts are quiet. I offer PvP entities access to my cyno network to get dank kills and big escalations. From super carriers to Rattlesnakes.
 
The thing that got me into camping was hunting bots back in the dronelands a few years ago. I realised the most effective way to hurt them was to camp them 23/7, follow them around using locator agents. Eventually they had to rat with me in system. When they did I setup bubble traps etc and dropped blops and cleaned them up.
 
The 2nd thing I love about cloaky camping is the ability to counter Alliances (i feel its overpowered) intel channels / networks. Think about it. They have multiple intel toons dotted around the entrances to their pipes reporting hunters coming into the pipe allowing the PvE players to warp off and safe up. They even use external programs to collect this intel and give audible alerts. Cloaky camping is just the polar opposite. Dotting toons in their ratting pocket and giving me intel on whats going on in their system. As long as local chat exists so will cloaky camping. I'm pretty confident CCP share the same thought.
 
People probably think cloaky camping is easy. You are wrong. The prep work and behind the scenes work that goes into it is pretty immense. You are about to find out.
 
The hardware i'm currently running the 60 clients on is as follows:
 
Camper1: Screenshot of 30 Clients Layout
Camper2:
 
How do you pay for 60 toons
I started with 10 campers and made ISK by other means. When I made new campers I invested ISK and started to Skill extract and plexing the toons. I also make a decent amount from people who pay me to camp others.
 
The Setup  
I manage the clients window positions and CPU allocation with ISBOXER. Its legal to use as long as you don't use input broadcasting. I boot up the clients with ISBOXER EVE Launcher. I copy the window positions / chat channels etc over using garpaui. I use remote desktop to manage the clients light cynos etc.
Example here
 
On both motherboards I had to under clock the processors as they were drawing too much power from the motherboard and causing the chipset to overheat. I think these motherboards are not beefy enough to support these 8 core processors. It caused the CPU to throttle reducing the clock speeds to 1.3Ghz and causing lag issues. I solved this problem by reducing the clock speed from 4Ghz to 3.6Ghz and reducing the CPU voltage. This reduced the heat by a really good amount and stopped the problems.
 
However, Me being me I wanted to expand and the camping pcs were running at full chat. So I needed a better piece of hardware to host these 60+ clients. So, while at Fanfest, I bidded on this R820 Server on ebay and won!
 
Specs:
 
The hardware should be able to support multiple clients. However i'm not too sure how eve is going to behave when I try and open 60 instances all in one OS. I have set myself up for a hell of a challenge! However, I feel like I got a pretty good deal on the server and DELL hold their value. I'm sure I can re sell it if the project fails.
 
Things to work out:
 
Things I will teach you guys
 
I'm learning too so your help input would be awesome! First question. Shall I just update this reddit post each time or create some sort of blog?
Old AMD FX Rigs
New Kit / with various bits I gathered to get started
 
Update 23/04/18
I have made some decent progress on this crazy project. I will give some breif updates here. I will get a blog up and running to post full details with how to's etc. Its probably way to long for reddit.
 
I have successfully installed some GPU's into the R810 AMD R9 280x and Nvidia GTX 970. I soldered some PCI-E cables to the PDB and it worked fine. The GTX sits nicely in the chassis however, the R9 280X is external atm using a PCIE x1 to x16 riser (from my bitcoin mining). Also I have managed to enable and use them both with passthrough in ESXI 6.5. Yes the GPU works with a x1 adaptor. WTF!
 
Freezing Problem with a single os install
If I try and run more than 40 clients in a single OS I the system freezes when loading up client 41. I have tried the following:
I cannot see why it is freezing. Is there any way to gather logs for the client? It doesn't appear to be a resource problem. Plenty of RAM / CPU and HDD isn't going crazy.
 
Here are some pics of the current progress:
submitted by Mar5hy to Eve [link] [comments]

[H] Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2019 NVIDIA code [W] 22 TF keys / 19 CS GO keys / 34.5 USD / 30 EUR

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2019 (EU / Battle.net)
22 TF keys / 19 CS GO keys / 34.5 USD / 30 EUR
Keys from Nvidia promo: https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/campaigns/call-of-duty-modern-warfare-bundle/
To redeem your promotional code for Call of Duty®: Modern Warfare®, please follow the steps below:
  1. Install the RTX series graphics card
  2. Update to the latest version or install GeForce Experience.
  3. Open the GeForce Experience app and sign in to your account.
  4. Open the drop-down menu in the upper right corner and click the "activate" button»
  5. Enter the gift code you received with your purchase.
<<< ONLY FOR GEFORCE RTX CARD USERS >>>
My post on Steamtraders: https://www.steamtrades.com/trade/ju8kP/h-call-of-duty-modern-warfare-2019-nvidia-code-w-25-tf-keys-23-cs-go-keys-40-usd
Buy via PayU/Visa/MasterCard/Maestro/MIBitcoin/Alipay/Unionpay : https://www.plati.market/itm/call-of-duty-modern-warfare-2019-nvidia-key-eu/2725486
submitted by Dreamwalker83 to GameTrade [link] [comments]

[H] Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2019 NVIDIA code [W] 22 TF keys / 19 CS GO keys / 34.5 USD / 30 EUR

Call of Duty: Modern Warfare 2019 (EU / Battle.net)
22 TF keys / 19 CS GO keys / 34.5 USD / 30 EUR
Keys from Nvidia promo: https://www.nvidia.com/en-us/geforce/campaigns/call-of-duty-modern-warfare-bundle/
To redeem your promotional code for Call of Duty®: Modern Warfare®, please follow the steps below:
  1. Install the RTX series graphics card
  2. Update to the latest version or install GeForce Experience.
  3. Open the GeForce Experience app and sign in to your account.
  4. Open the drop-down menu in the upper right corner and click the "activate" button»
  5. Enter the gift code you received with your purchase.
<<< ONLY FOR GEFORCE RTX CARD USERS >>>
My post on Steamtraders: https://www.steamtrades.com/trade/ju8kP/h-call-of-duty-modern-warfare-2019-nvidia-code-w-25-tf-keys-23-cs-go-keys-40-usd
Buy via PayU/Visa/MasterCard/Maestro/MIBitcoin/Alipay/Unionpay : https://www.plati.market/itm/call-of-duty-modern-warfare-2019-nvidia-key-eu/2725486
submitted by Dreamwalker83 to GameTrade [link] [comments]

[META] New to PC Building? - September 2018 Edition

Intro

You've heard from all your gaming friends/family or co-workers that custom PCs are the way to go. Or maybe you've been fed up with your HP, Dell, Acer, Gateway, Lenovo, etc. pre-builts or Macs and want some more quality and value in your next PC purchase. Or maybe you haven't built a PC in a long time and want to get back into the game. Well, here's a good place to start.

Instructions

  1. Make a budget for your PC (e.g., $800, $1000, $1250, $1500, etc.).
  2. Decide what you will use your PC for.
    • For gaming, decide what games and at what resolution and FPS you want to play at.
    • For productivity, decide what software you'll need and find the recommended specs to use those apps.
    • For a bit of both, your PC build should be built on the HIGHEST specs recommended for your applications (e.g., if you only play FortNite and need CPU power for CFD simulations, use specs recommended for CFD).
    Here are some rough estimates for builds with entirely NEW parts:
    1080p 60FPS ultra-settings modern AAA gaming: ~$1,200
    1440p 60FPS high/ultra-settings modern AAA gaming: ~$1,600
    1080p 144FPS ultra-settings modern AAA gaming: $2,000
    4K 50FPS medium/high-settings modern AAA gaming: > $2,400
    It's noted that some compromises (e.g., lower settings and/or resolution) can be made to achieve the same or slightly lower gaming experience within ±15% of the above prices. It's also noted that you can still get higher FPS on older or used PCs by lowering settings and/or resolution AND/OR buying new/used parts to upgrade your system. Make a new topic about it if you're interested.
    Also note that AAA gaming is different from e-sport games like CSGO, DOTA2, FortNite, HOTS, LoL, Overwatch, R6S, etc. Those games have lower requirements and can make do with smaller budgets.
  3. Revise your budget AND/OR resolution and FPS until both are compatible. Compare this to the recommended requirements of the most demanding game on your list. For older games, you might be able to lower your budget. For others, you might have to increase your budget.
    It helps to watch gaming benchmarks on Youtube. A good example of what you're looking for is something like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=9eLxSOoSdjY). Take note of the resolution, settings, FPS, and the specs in the video title/description; ask yourself if the better gaming experience is worth increasing your budget OR if you're okay with lower settings and lowering your budget. Note that you won't be able to see FPS higher than 60FPS for Youtube videos; something like this would have to be seen in-person at a computer shop.
  4. Make a build on https://ca.pcpartpicker.com/. If you still have no idea how to put together parts, start here (http://www.logicalincrements.com/) to get an understanding of PC part tiers. If you want more info about part explanations and brief buying tips, see the next section below.
  5. Click on the Reddit logo button next to Markup, copy and paste the generated text (in markup mode if using new Reddit), and share your build for review!
  6. Consider which retailer to buy your parts from. Here's a table comparing different retailers: https://docs.google.com/spreadsheets/d/1L8uijxuoJH4mjKCjwkJbCrKprCiU8CtM15mvOXxzV1s/edit?usp=sharing
  7. Buy your parts! Use PCPP above to send you e-mail alerts on price drops or subscribe to /bapcsalescanada for deals.
    You can get parts from the following PC retailers in alphabetical order:
  8. After procuring your parts, it's time to build. Use a good Youtube tutorial like this (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=IhX0fOUYd8Q) that teach BAPC fundamentals, but always refer to your product manuals or other Youtube tutorials for part-specific instructions like CPU mounting, radiator mounting, CMOS resetting, etc. If it everything still seems overwhelming, you can always pay a computer shop or a friend/family member to build it for you.
    It might also be smart to look up some first-time building mistakes to avoid:
  9. Share your experience with us.
  10. If you have any other questions, use the search bar first. If it's not there, make a topic.

BAPC News (Last Updated - 2018/09/20)

CPU

https://www.tomshardware.com/news/intel-9000-series-cpu-faq,37743.html
Intel 9000 CPUs (Coffee Lake Refresh) will be coming out in Q4. With the exception of i9 (8-core, 12 threads) flagship CPUs, the i3, i5, and i7 lineups are almost identical to their Intel 8000 (Coffee Lake) series, but slightly clocked faster. If you are wondering if you should upgrade to the newer CPU on the same tier (e.g., i5-8400 to i5-9400), I don't recommend that you do as you will only see marginal performance increases.

Mobo

https://www.anandtech.com/show/13135/more-details-on-intels-z390-chipset-exposed
Z370s will now be phased out for Z390s boards, which will natively support Intel 9000 CPUs (preferably i5-9600K, i7-9700K, and i9-9900K).

GPU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=WDrpsv0QIR0
RTX 2080 and 2080 Ti benchmarks are out; they provide ~10 and ~20 frames better than the 1080 Ti and also feature ray tracing (superior lighting and shadow effects) which is featured in only ~30 games so far (i.e., not supported a lot); effectively, they provide +25% more performance for +70% increased cost. My recommendation is NOT to buy them unless you need it for work or have lots of disposable income. GTX 1000 Pascal series are still relevant in today's gaming specs.

Part Explanations

CPU

The calculator part. More GHz is analogous to fast fingers number crunching in the calculator. More cores is analogous to having more calculators. More threads is analogous to having more filing clerks piling more work for the calculator to do. Microarchitectures (core design) is analogous to how the internal circuit inside the calculator is designed (e.g., AMD FX series are slower than Intel equivalents even with higher OC'd GHz speeds because the core design is subpar). All three are important in determining CPU speed.
In general, higher GHz is more important for gaming now whereas # cores and threads are more important for multitasking like streaming, video editing, and advanced scientific/engineering computations. Core designs from both AMD and Intel in their most recent products are very good now, but something to keep in mind.

Overclocking

The basic concept of overclocking (OCing) is to feed your CPU more power through voltage and hoping it does calculations faster. Whether your parts are good overclockers depends on the manufacturing process of your specific part and slight variations in materials and manufacturing process will result in different overclocking capability ("silicon lottery"). The downside to this is that you can void your warranties because doing this will produce excess heat that will decrease the lifespan of your parts AND that there is a trial-and-error process to finding OC settings that are stable. Unstable OC settings result in computer freezes or random shut-offs from excess heat. OCing will give you extra performance often for free or by investing in a CPU cooler to control your temperatures so that the excess heat will not decrease your parts' lifespans as much. If you don't know how to OC, don't do it.

Current Products

Intel CPUs have higher GHz than AMD CPUs, which make them better for gaming purposes. However, AMD Ryzen CPUs have more cores and threads than their Intel equivalents. The new parts are AMD Ryzen 3, 5, or 7 2000 series or Intel i3, i5, or i7 8000 series (Coffee Lake). Everything else is outdated.
If you want to overclock on an AMD system, know that you can get some moderate OC on a B350/B450 with all CPUs. X370/X470 mobos usually come with better VRMs meant for OCing 2600X, 2700, and 2700X. If you don't know how to OC, know that the -X AMD CPUs have the ability to OC themselves automatically without manually settings. For Intel systems, you cannot OC unless the CPU is an unlocked -K chip (e.g., i3-8350K, i5-8600K, i7-8700K, etc.) AND the motherboard is a Z370 mobo. In general, it is not worth getting a Z370 mobo UNLESS you are getting an i5-8600K and i7-8700K.

CPU and Mobo Compatibility

Note about Ryzen 2000 CPUs on B350 mobos: yes, you CAN pair them up since they use the same socket. You might get an error message on PCPP that says that they might not be compatible. Call the retailer and ask if the mobo you're planning on buying has a "Ryzen 2000 Series Ready" sticker on the box. This SHOULD NOT be a problem with any mobos manufactured after February 2018.
Note about Intel 9000 CPUs on B360 / Z370 mobos: same as above with Ryzen 2000 CPUs on B350 or X370 boards.

CPU Cooler (Air / Liquid)

Air or liquid cooling for your CPU. This is mostly optional unless heavy OCing on AMD Ryzen CPUs and/or on Intel -K and i7-8700 CPUs.
For more information about air and liquid cooling comparisons, see here:

Motherboard/mobo

Part that lets all the parts talk to each other. Comes in different sizes from small to big: mITX, mATX, ATX, and eATX. For most people, mATX is cost-effective and does the job perfectly. If you need more features like extra USB slots, go for an ATX. mITX is for those who want a really small form factor and are willing to pay a premium for it. eATX mobos are like ATX mobos except that they have more features and are bigger - meant for super PC enthusiasts who need the features.
If you are NOT OCing, pick whatever is cheap and meets your specs. I recommend ASUS or MSI because they have RMA centres in Canada in case it breaks whereas other parts are outside of Canada like in the US. If you are OCing, then you need to look at the quality of the VRMs because those will greatly influence the stability and lifespan of your parts.

Memory/RAM

Part that keeps Windows and your software active. Currently runs on the DDR4 platform for new builds. Go for dual channel whenever possible. Here's a breakdown of how much RAM you need:
AMD Ryzen CPUs get extra FPS for faster RAM speeds (ideally 3200MHz) in gaming when paired with powerful video cards like the GTX 1070. Intel Coffee Lake CPUs use up a max of 2667MHz for B360 mobos. Higher end Z370 mobos can support 4000 - 4333MHz RAM depending on the mobo, so make sure you shop carefully!
It's noted that RAM prices are highly inflated because of the smartphone industry and possibly artificial supply shortages. For more information: https://www.extremetech.com/computing/263031-ram-prices-roof-stuck-way

Storage

Part that store your files in the form of SSDs and HDDs.

Solid State Drives (SSDs)

SSDs are incredibly quick, but are expensive per TB; they are good for booting up Windows and for reducing loading times for gaming. For an old OEM pre-built, upgrading the PC with an SSD is the single greatest speed booster you can do to your system. For most people, you want to make sure the SSD you get is NOT DRAM-less as these SSDs do not last as long as their DRAM counterparts (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ybIXsrLCgdM). It is also noted that the bigger the capacity of the SSD, the faster they are. SSDs come in four forms:
The 2.5" SATA form is cheaper, but it is the old format with speeds up to 550MB/s. M.2 SATA SSDs have the same transfer speeds as 2.5" SATA SSDs since they use the SATA interface, but connect directly to the mobo without a cable. It's better for cable management to get an M.2 SATA SSD over a 2.5" SATA III SSD. M.2 PCI-e SSDs are the newest SSD format and transfer up to 4GB/s depending on the PCI-e lanes they use (e.g., 1x, 2x, 4x, etc.). They're great for moving large files (e.g., 4K video production). For more info about U.2 drives, see this post (https://www.reddit.com/bapccanada/comments/8jxfqs/meta_new_to_pc_building_may_2018_edition/dzqj5ks/). Currently more common for enterprise builds, but could see some usage in consumer builds.

Hard Disk Drives (HDDs)

HDDs are slow with transfer speeds of ~100MB/s, but are cheap per TB compared to SSDs. We are now at SATA III speeds, which have a max theoretical transfer rate of 600MB/s. They also come in 5400RPM and 7200RPM forms. 5400RPM uses slightly less power and are cheaper, but aren't as fast at dealing with a large number of small files as 7200RPM HDDs. When dealing with a small number of large files, they have roughly equivalent performance. It is noted that even a 10,000RPM HDD will still be slower than an average 2.5" SATA III SSD.

Others

SSHDs are hybrids of SSDs and HDDs. Although they seem like a good combination, it's much better in all cases to get a dedicated SSD and a dedicated HDD instead. This is because the $/speed better for SSDs and the $/TB is better for HDDs. The same can be said for Intel Optane. They both have their uses, but for most users, aren't worth it.

Overall

I recommend a 2.5" or M.2 SATA ≥ 250GB DRAM SSD and a 1TB or 2TB 7200RPM HDD configuration for most users for a balance of speed and storage capacity.

Video Card/GPU

Part that runs complex calculations in games and outputs to your monitor and is usually the most expensive part of the budget. The GPU you pick is dictated by the gaming resolution and FPS you want to play at.
In general, all video cards of the same product name have almost the same non-OC'd performance (e.g., Asus Dual-GTX1060-06G has the same performance as the EVGA 06G-P4-6163-KR SC GAMING). The different sizes and # fans DO affect GPU OCing capability, however. The most important thing here is to get an open-air video card, NOT a blower video card (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=0domMRFG1Rw). The blower card is meant for upgrading pre-builts where case airflow is limited.
For cost-performance, go for the NVIDIA GTX cards because of the cryptomining industry that has inflated AMD RX cards. Bitcoin has taken a -20% hit since January's $10,000+ as of recently, but the cryptomining industry is still ongoing. Luckily, this means prices have nearly corrected itself to original MSRP in 2016.
In general:
Note that if your monitor has FreeSync technology, get an AMD card. If your monitor has G-Sync, get a NVIDIA card. Both technologies allow for smooth FPS gameplay. If you don't have either, it doesn't really matter which brand you get.
For AMD RX cards, visit https://www.pcworld.com/article/3197885/components-graphics/every-amd-radeon-rx-graphics-card-you-can-buy-for-pc-gaming.html

New NVIDIA GeForce RTX Series

New NVIDIA 2000 RTX series have been recently announced and will be carried in stores in Q3 and Q4. Until all of the products have been fully vetted and reviewed, we cannot recommend those yet as I cannot say if they are worth what NVIDIA has marketed them as. But they will be faster than their previous equivalents and will require more wattage to use. The 2070, 2080, and 2080 Ti will feature ray tracing, which is a new feature seen in modern CG movies that greatly enhances lighting and shadow effects. At this time, < 30 games will use ray tracing (https://www.pcgamer.com/21-games-will-support-nvidias-real-time-ray-tracing-here-are-demos-of-tomb-raider-and-control/). It's also noted that the 2080 Ti is the Titan XP equivalent, which is why it's so expensive. (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Irs8jyEmmPQ) The community's general recommendation is NOT to pre-order them until we see some reviews and benchmarks from reviewers first.
Looks like a couple of benchmarks are out. While keeping other parts equal the following results were obtained(https://videocardz.com/77983/nvidia-geforce-rtx-2080-ti-and-rtx-2080-official-performance-unveiled). So the 2080 and 2080 Ti are better than last generation's 1080 Ti by ~10 and ~20 frames respectively.

Case

Part that houses your parts and protects them from its environment. Should often be the last part you choose because the selection is big enough to be compatible with any build you choose as long as the case is equal to or bigger than the mobo form factor.
Things to consider: aesthetics, case airflow, cable management, material, cooling options (radiators or # of fan spaces), # fans included, # drive bays, toolless installation, power supply shroud, GPU clearance length, window if applicable (e.g., acrylic, tempered glass), etc.
It is recommended to watch or read case reviews on Youtube to get an idea of a case's performance in your setup.

Power Supply/PSU

Part that runs your PC from the wall socket. Never go with an non-reputable/cheap brand out on these parts as low-quality parts could damage your other parts. Recommended branded PSUs are Corsair, EVGA, Seasonic, and Thermaltake, generally. For a tier list, see here (https://linustechtips.com/main/topic/631048-psu-tier-list-updated/).

Wattage

Wattage depends on the video card chosen, if you plan to OC, and/or if you plan to upgrade to a more powerful PSU in the future. Here's a rule of thumb for non-OC wattages that meet NVIDIA's recommendations:
There are also PSU wattage calculators that you can use to estimate your wattage. How much wattage you used is based on your PC parts, how much OCing you're doing, your peripherals (e.g., gaming mouse and keyboard), and how long you plan to leave your computer running, etc. It is noted that these calculators use conservative estimates, so use the outputted wattage as a baseline of how much you need. Here are the calculators (thanks, VitaminDeity).
Pick ONE calculator to use and use the recommended wattage, NOT recommended product, as a baseline of what wattage you need for your build. Note that Cooler Master and Seasonic use the exact calculator as Outervision. For more details about wattage, here are some reference videos:

Modularity

You might also see some info about modularity (non-modular, semi-modular, or fully-modular). These describe if the cables will come connected to the PSU or can be separated of your own choosing. Non-modular PSUs have ALL of the cable connections attached to the PSU with no option to remove unneeded cables. Semi-modular PSUs have separate cables for HDDs/SSDs and PCI-e connectors, but will have CPU and mobo cables attached. Modular PSUs have all of their cables separate from each other, allowing you to fully control over cable management. It is noted that with decent cooling and airflow in your case, cable management has little effect on your temperatures (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=YDCMMf-_ASE).

80+ Efficiency Ratings

As for ratings (80+, 80+ bronze, 80+ gold, 80+ platinum), these are the efficiencies of your PSU. Please see here for more information. If you look purely on electricity costs, the 80+ gold PSUs will be more expensive than 80+ bronze PSUs for the average Canadian user until a breakeven point of 6 years (assuming 8 hours/day usage), but often the better performance, longer warranty periods, durable build quality, and extra features like fanless cooling is worth the extra premium. In general, the rule of thumb is 80+ bronze for entry-level office PCs and 80+ gold for mid-tier or higher gaming/workstation builds. If the price difference between a 80+ bronze PSU and 80+ gold PSU is < 20%, get the 80+ gold PSU!

Warranties

Warranties should also be looked at when shopping for PSUs. In general, longer warranties also have better PSU build quality. In general, for 80+ bronze and gold PSU units from reputable brands:
Any discrepancies are based on varied wattages (i.e., higher wattages have longer warranties) or updated warranty periods. Please refer to the specific product's warranty page for the correct information. For EVGA PSUs, see here (https://www.evga.com/support/warranty/power-supplies/). For Seasonic PSUs, see here (https://seasonic.com/support#period). For Corsair PSUs, see here (https://www.corsair.com/ca/en/warranty).
For all other PSU inquiries, look up the following review sites for the PSUs you're interested in buying:
These guys are engineering experts who take apart PSUs, analyze the quality of each product, and provide an evaluation of the product. Another great website is http://www.orionpsudb.com/, which shows which PSUs are manufactured by different OEMs.

Operating System (OS)

Windows 10

The most common OS. You can download the ISO here (https://www.microsoft.com/en-ca/software-download/windows10). For instructions on how to install the ISO from a USB drive, see here (https://docs.microsoft.com/en-us/windows-hardware/manufacture/desktop/install-windows-from-a-usb-flash-drive) or watch a video here (https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gLfnuE1unS8). For most users, go with the 64-bit version.
If you purchase a Windows 10 retail key (i.e., you buy it from a retailer or from Microsoft directly), keep in mind that you are able to transfer it between builds. So if you're building another PC for the 2nd, 3rd, etc. time, you can reuse the key for those builds PROVIDED that you deactivate your key before installing it on your new PC. These keys are ~$120.
However, if you have an OEM key (e.g., pre-builts), that key is tied specifically to your mobo. If you ever decide to upgrade your mobo on that pre-built PC, you might have to buy a new Windows 10 license. For more information, see this post (https://www.techadvisor.co.uk/feature/windows/windows-10-oem-or-retail-3665849/). The cheaper Windows 10 keys you can find on Kinguin are OEM keys; activating and deactivating these keys may require phoning an automated Microsoft activation line. Most of these keys are legitimate and cost ~$35, although Microsoft does not intend for home users to obtain this version of it. Buyer beware.
The last type of key is a volume licensing key. They are licensed in large volumes to corporate or commercial usage. You can find lots of these keys on eBay for ~$10, but if the IT department who manages these keys audit who is using these keys or if the number of activations have exceeded the number allotted on that one key, Microsoft could block that key and invalidate your license. Buyer beware.
For more information on differentiating between all three types of keys, see this page (https://www.tenforums.com/tutorials/49586-determine-if-windows-license-type-oem-retail-volume.html).
If money is tight, you can get Windows 10 from Microsoft and use a trial version of it indefinitely. However, there will be a watermark in the bottom-right of your screen until you activate your Windows key.

MacOS

If you're interested in using MacOS, look into Hackintosh builds. This will allow you to run MacOS to run on PC parts, saving you lots of money. These builds are pretty picky about part compatibility, so you might run into some headaches trying to go through with this. For more information, see the following links:

Linux

If you're interested in a free open-source OS, see the following links:
For more information, go to /linux, /linuxquestions, and /linux4noobs.

Peripherals

Monitors

Keyboards and Mice

Overall

Please note that the cost-performance builds will change daily because PC part prices change often! Some builds will have excellent cost-performance one day and then have terrible cost-performance the next. If you want to optimize cost-performance, it is your responsibility to do this if you go down this route!
Also, DO NOT PM me with PC build requests! It is in your best interests to make your own topic so you can get multiple suggestions and input from the community rather than just my own. Thanks again.

Sample Builds

Here are some sample builds that are reliable, but may not be cost-optimized builds. These builds were created on September 9, 2018; feel free to "edit this part list" and create your own builds.

Links

Helpful links to common problems below:

Contributors

Thanks to:

Housekeeping

2019/09/22
2019/09/18
Updates:
2019/09/09
Updates:
Sorry for the lack of updates. I recently got a new job where I work 12 hours/day for 7 days at a time out of the city. What little spare time I have is spent on grad school and the gym instead of gaming. So I've been pretty behind on the news and some might not be up-to-date as my standards would have been with less commitments. If I've made any mistakes, please understand it might take a while for me to correct them. Thank you!
submitted by BlackRiot to bapccanada [link] [comments]

DNSBL is currently not blocking anything after recent pfsense update

I do not know if there was any update on the pfblockerng-devel package recently, as I just updated pfsense when I saw that it was available. After this update, DNSBL is not showing anything in the reports tab for blocks. The IP blocklists are working correctly, and when it reloads, it shows that unbound resolver, as well as the blocklists in DNSBL are loaded correctly. I do not know what could have caused this, and if I will have to re-install all of Pfsense to get it to work again. I have already tried to uninstall(while not keeping any previous settings), and then re-installing while re-doing all of the feeds in DNSBL.

TOP1M Final

33 33 1 0 0 32
[ Wally3kpersonal ] Reload [ 05/25/19 16:31:55 ] . completed .. Whitelist: analytics.ff.avast.com|analytics.plex.tv|app.adjust.com|content.tapjoy.com|gfe.nvidia.com|gfwsl.geforce.com|gstaticadssl.l.google.com|ip-info.ff.avast.com|ipm-provider.ff.avast.com|open.oneplus.net|placements.tapjoy.com|reports.crashlytics.com|rpc.tapjoy.com|settings.crashlytics.com|v7event.stats.avast.com|www-googletagmanager.l.google.com|
Orig. Unique # Dups # White # TOP1M Final
740 734 697 16 0 21
[ NewPihole_custom ] Reload [ 05/25/19 16:31:58 ] No Domains Found! Ensure only domain based Feeds are used for DNSBL!
[ Samsungblocks_custom ] Reload.
Orig. Unique # Dups # White # TOP1M Final
31 29 26 0 0 3
Saving DNSBL database... completed
Assembling DNSBL database... completed [ 05/25/19 16:32:07 ] Reloading Unbound Resolver..... completed [ 05/25/19 16:32:27 ]

DNSBL update [ 1654237 | PASSED ]... completed [ 05/25/19 16:32:28 ]

===[ GeoIP Process ]============================================
===[ IPv4 Process ]=================================================
[ Whitelist_custom_v4 ] exists. [ Abuse_DYRE_v4 ] Downloading update .. 404 Not Found
[ pfB_PRI1_v4 - Abuse_DYRE_v4 ] Download FAIL [ 05/25/19 16:32:29 ] Firewall and/or IDS (Legacy mode only) are not blocking download.
The Following List has been REMOVED [ Abuse_DYRE_v4 ]
[ Abuse_Feodo_C2_v4 ] exists. [ Abuse_IPBL_v4 ] exists. [ CINS_army_v4 ] exists. [ ET_Block_v4 ] exists. [ ET_Comp_v4 ] exists. [ Talos_BL_v4 ] Downloading update .. 403 Forbidden
[ pfB_PRI1_v4 - Talos_BL_v4 ] Download FAIL Firewall and/or IDS (Legacy mode only) are not blocking download.
The Following List has been REMOVED [ Talos_BL_v4 ]
[ Abuse_CW_PS_v4 ] exists. [ Abuse_LY_PS_v4 ] exists. [ BotScout_v4 ] exists. [ MDL_v4 ] exists. [ SFS_Toxic_v4 ] exists. [ CoinBlocker_v4 ] Downloading update .. 404 Not Found
[ pfB_PRI4_v4 - CoinBlocker_v4 ] Download FAIL [ 05/25/19 16:32:30 ] Firewall and/or IDS (Legacy mode only) are not blocking download.
The Following List has been REMOVED [ CoinBlocker_v4 ]
[ HoneyPot_IPs_v4 ] exists. [ Malc0de_v4 ] exists. [ Improware_v4 ] exists. [ LB_BL_v4 ] Downloading update . cURL Error: 28 Connection timed out after 15018 milliseconds Retry in 5 seconds... . cURL Error: 28 Connection timed out after 15002 milliseconds Retry in 5 seconds... . cURL Error: 28 Connection timed out after 15003 milliseconds Retry in 5 seconds... .. unknown http status code | 0
[ pfB_MAIL_v4 - LB_BL_v4 ] Download FAIL [ 05/25/19 16:33:30 ] Firewall and/or IDS (Legacy mode only) are not blocking download.
The Following List has been REMOVED [ LB_BL_v4 ]
[ Nix_Spam_v4 ] exists. [ SpamCop_SC_v4 ] exists. [ Toastedspam_v4 ] exists. [ DNSBLIP_v4 ] Downloading update .. completed ..
Reputation (Max=50) - Range(s) 185.244.25.|37.9.55.|146.185.236.|146.185.238.|64.154.80.|
Reputation -Max Stats
Blacklisted Match Ranges IPs Ranges IPs
5 877 0 0
Original Master Final
14168 12832 12832 [ Pass ]
===[ Reputation - pMax ]======================================
Querying for repeat offenders ( pMax=50 ) [ 05/25/19 16:33:31 ] Reputation -pMax ( None )
===[ Reputation - dMax ]======================================
Querying for repeat offenders ( dMax=20 ) [ 05/25/19 16:33:31 ] Classifying repeat offenders by GeoIP Processing [ Block ] IPs Removing [ Block ] IPs
Removed the following IP ranges: 212.27.35.|216.200.199.|207.246.136.|206.65.183.|209.132.193.|209.132.218.|209.132.220.|205.180.85.|61.135.131.|207.68.178.|204.253.104.|200.221.6.|
Reputation - dMax Stats
Blacklisted Match Ranges IPs Ranges IPs
12 359 0 0
===[ Suppression Stats ]===================================

List Pre Suppress Master

Abuse_Feodo_C2_v4 427 427 42824 Abuse_IPBL_v4 333 333 42824 CINS_army_v4 13730 13730 42824 ET_Block_v4 888 888 42824 ET_Comp_v4 498 498 42824 Abuse_CW_PS_v4 1 1 42824 Abuse_LY_PS_v4 1 1 42824 BotScout_v4 55 55 42824 MDL_v4 968 968 42824 SFS_Toxic_v4 83 83 42824 HoneyPot_IPs_v4 24 24 42824 Malc0de_v4 65 65 42824 Improware_v4 973 973 42824 Nix_Spam_v4 10323 10323 42824 SpamCop_SC_v4 195 195 42824 Toastedspam_v4 1775 1775 42824 DNSBLIP_v4 12485 12485 42824
===[ Aliastables / Rules ]==========================================
No changes to Firewall rules, skipping Filter Reload
Updating: pfB_Whitelist_v4 no changes. Updating: pfB_PRI1_v4 no changes. Updating: pfB_Abuse_PS_v4 no changes. Updating: pfB_PRI3_v4 no changes. Updating: pfB_PRI4_v4 no changes. Updating: pfB_MAIL_v4 no changes. Updating: pfB_DNSBLIP_v4 no changes.
===[ FINAL Processing ]=====================================
[ Original IP count ] [ 76449 ]
[ Final IP Count ] [ 42824 ]
===[ Permit List IP Counts ]=========================
 2 /vadb/pfblockerng/permit/Whitelist_custom_v4.txt 
===[ Deny List IP Counts ]===========================
42824 total 13730 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/CINS_army_v4.txt 12485 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/DNSBLIP_v4.txt 10323 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Nix_Spam_v4.txt 1775 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Toastedspam_v4.txt 973 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Improware_v4.txt 968 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/MDL_v4.txt 888 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/ET_Block_v4.txt 498 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/ET_Comp_v4.txt 427 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Abuse_Feodo_C2_v4.txt 333 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Abuse_IPBL_v4.txt 195 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/SpamCop_SC_v4.txt 83 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/SFS_Toxic_v4.txt 65 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Malc0de_v4.txt 55 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/BotScout_v4.txt 24 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/HoneyPot_IPs_v4.txt 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Abuse_LY_PS_v4.txt 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/deny/Abuse_CW_PS_v4.txt
====================[ Empty Lists w/127.1.7.7 ]==================
Abuse_CW_PS_v4.txt
===[ DNSBL Domain/IP Counts ] ===================================
1668405 total 1083648 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/New.txt 370231 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/BBC_DGA.txt 51684 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_urlhaus.txt 35526 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Joewein_base.txt 20185 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/CoinBlocker_All.txt 14305 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/MDS.txt 11617 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/adguard.txt 10810 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/SFS_Toxic_BD.txt 10347 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Shallamalware.txt 7616 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_urlhaus_v4.ip 5739 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/CCT_BD.txt 5431 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/SWC.txt 5367 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/adserver.txt 4410 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Shallalist_adv_v4.ip 4140 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Spam404.txt 4036 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Easylist.txt 3300 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Shallalist_adv.txt 3130 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/hpHosts_ATS.txt 2619 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Quidsup_Trackers.txt 2503 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_malware.txt 2009 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_URLBL.txt 1869 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/CCT_BD_v4.ip 1515 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/MDS_Immortal.txt 1293 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Cameleon.txt 588 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/EasyPrivacy.txt 560 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_publicite.txt 509 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/CoinBlocker_Opt.txt 493 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_marketingware.txt 456 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/MVPS.txt 317 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/ISC_SDL.txt 289 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/MDL.txt 280 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/EasyList.txt 267 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_ddos.txt 235 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/D_Me_Malv.txt 205 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_bitcoin.txt 205 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Adaway.txt 129 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_DOMBL.txt 78 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Joewein_base_v4.ip 76 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/BBC_DC2.txt 74 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_publicite_v4.ip 58 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_URLBL_v4.ip 32 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Torrentlocker.txt 31 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/SFS_Toxic_BD_v4.ip 31 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Quidsup_Mal.txt 28 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Joewein_new.txt 26 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/SBL_ADs.txt 25 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_bitcoin_v4.ip 25 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Lockyrw.txt 21 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Wally3kpersonal.txt 15 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Yoyo.txt 5 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/EasyList_v4.ip 5 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/ADs_custom.txt 3 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Samsungblocks_custom.txt 2 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_Zeus_BD.txt 2 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_CW_C2.txt 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/UT1_marketingware_v4.ip 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/NoCoin.txt 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/MoneroMiner.txt 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Malc0de.txt 1 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/EasyPrivacy_v4.ip 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/simple.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/malvertising1.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/hosts2.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/dgad.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/coinblockernew.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/adhost.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/adaway.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Windows_hosts_block.fail 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Teslacrypt.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Ransomware1.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/NewPihole_custom.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Malware2.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Malware1.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/H3X_1h.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/D_Me_Tracking.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/D_Me_Malw.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/D_Me_ADs.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Cryptowall1.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_TC_C2.txt 0 /vadb/pfblockerng/dnsbl/Abuse_C2_custom.txt
====================[ IPv4/6 Last Updated List Summary ]==============
Feb 8 2017 Improware_v4 Feb 21 09:45 MDL_v4 May 23 06:17 Malc0de_v4 May 23 21:29 ET_Comp_v4 May 23 21:37 Whitelist_custom_v4 May 24 23:35 CINS_army_v4 May 24 23:51 BotScout_v4 May 24 23:59 SFS_Toxic_v4 May 25 00:00 Nix_Spam_v4 May 25 00:05 Abuse_LY_PS_v4 May 25 00:05 Abuse_CW_PS_v4 May 25 00:05 Abuse_IPBL_v4 May 25 00:05 Abuse_Feodo_C2_v4 May 25 00:06 Toastedspam_v4 May 25 00:07 ET_Block_v4 May 25 00:07 HoneyPot_IPs_v4 May 25 00:08 SpamCop_SC_v4 May 25 16:33 DNSBLIP_v4
====================[ DNSBL Last Updated List Summary ]==============
Jul 31 2015 D_Me_Tracking Mar 9 2016 simple Mar 9 2016 D_Me_ADs Jan 20 2018 adaway Jan 20 2018 Adaway Mar 18 2018 Cameleon Nov 29 13:50 MDS_Immortal Feb 21 09:45 MDL Apr 15 22:17 Wally3kpersonal May 7 07:51 hpHosts_ATS May 7 07:51 adhost May 8 09:55 MVPS May 14 22:14 SWC May 17 12:21 Malware1 May 17 16:00 Shallamalware May 18 06:31 adguard May 18 06:41 Easylist May 21 06:13 coinblockernew May 21 06:13 CoinBlocker_Opt May 21 06:13 CoinBlocker_All May 22 21:57 Abuse_Zeus_BD May 22 21:58 Spam404 May 22 22:00 Shallalist_adv May 22 22:00 CCT_BD May 22 22:00 H3X_1h May 22 22:00 MoneroMiner May 22 22:00 NoCoin May 22 22:00 Quidsup_Mal May 22 22:00 Quidsup_Trackers May 22 22:01 adserver May 22 22:01 hosts2 May 22 22:01 Malware2 May 23 04:40 Yoyo May 23 06:10 Malc0de May 24 05:07 dgad May 24 05:07 SBL_ADs May 24 13:28 MDS May 24 16:00 New May 24 17:15 BBC_DGA May 24 21:01 Joewein_base May 24 21:04 ISC_SDL May 24 23:12 BBC_DC2 May 24 23:21 malvertising1 May 24 23:21 D_Me_Malw May 24 23:21 D_Me_Malv May 24 23:51 EasyList May 24 23:51 EasyPrivacy May 24 23:59 SFS_Toxic_BD May 25 00:00 Torrentlocker May 25 00:00 Lockyrw May 25 00:00 Cryptowall1 May 25 00:00 Abuse_URLBL May 25 00:00 Abuse_DOMBL May 25 00:00 Abuse_CW_C2 May 25 00:00 Abuse_urlhaus May 25 00:00 Joewein_new May 25 00:05 Teslacrypt May 25 00:05 Abuse_TC_C2 May 25 00:05 Ransomware1 May 25 14:12 UT1_bitcoin May 25 14:12 UT1_ddos May 25 14:12 UT1_malware May 25 14:12 UT1_marketingware May 25 14:12 UT1_publicite May 25 16:30 Abuse_C2_custom May 25 16:30 ADs_custom May 25 16:31 NewPihole_custom

May 25 16:31 Samsungblocks_custom

Database Sanity check [ PASSED ]

Masterfile/Deny folder uniq check Deny foldeMasterfile uniq check

Sync check (Pass=No IPs reported)

Alias table IP Counts

42826 total 15876 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_PRI1_v4.txt 13266 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_MAIL_v4.txt 12485 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_DNSBLIP_v4.txt 1106 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_PRI3_v4.txt 89 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_PRI4_v4.txt 2 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_Whitelist_v4.txt 2 /vadb/aliastables/pfB_Abuse_PS_v4.txt

pfSense Table Stats

table-entries hard limit 400000 Table Usage Count 154505
UPDATE PROCESS ENDED [ 05/25/19 16:33:33 ]
submitted by disguyisheren to pfBlockerNG [link] [comments]

Physical Graphics Card Market Plan of Attack

To set the precedent, in case you didn't know, CPU graphics cards (GPUs) have had a price spike due to the crypto craze, where: "pricing for Nvidia’s GeForce GTX 1070 should be around $380 (depending on the model), but that some cards are now being sold for more than $700 due to the stock shortages – an increase of more than 80 percent." - The Verge on GPU and Crypto mining
Now, due to the decrease in Crypto share price (SP), used GPUs are entering the physical market on Ebay and other for sale sites at a discount price, yet still not at preferred retail.
If the recent news capitulating Crypto Currency is having the desired effect, then there should be a "return" of mining viability, which would in effect drive the GPU price back to near peak crypto market levels.
Could it be savvy, then, to buy out the physical used GPU market at "relative" discount prices, and resell on an assumed imminent Crypto market return? It is currently a falling knife, but lets say the Crypto SP continues to fall into the week, could we effectively time a physical product buy time (On a trending early uptick of Crypto SPs) that could increase a Physical asset price from $600 to $800 with zero depreciation? If timed correctly, I think I could get a hold of quite a few graphics cards at a relatively cheap price, just to resell them on the same marketplace BACK to the same people who sold them to me at a premium, sort of like a short squeeze but utilizing Craigslist, Ebay, Amazon, and Facebook markets rather than the stock exchange.
Thoughts?
submitted by Helliarc to StockMarket [link] [comments]

Workstation/Gaming Rig for College

Hi guys! I'm off to college in September and having built my last PC about 5 years ago, I feel like I'm due for an upgrade. I'm not worried at all for budget (got lucky with bitcoin), and my budget is around USD $4000. I put together a list of parts for a rig for college. I'm going to be majoring in film (specialising in editing but who knows where I'll end up). I also love to play most AAA titles, produce music and 3D model/animate. I opted for a smaller smaller form factor so I don't need to have a huge hulking thing in my dorm but it isn't necessary.
What I want to know if these parts are the best option for my needs, since I do a few different things. I especially need some help with choice of monitor (or if I should get more than one)
PCPartPicker Part List
Type Item Price
CPU Intel - Core i9-9900K 3.6 GHz 8-Core Processor $489.99 @ Walmart
CPU Cooler NZXT - Kraken X62 Rev 2 98.17 CFM Liquid CPU Cooler $149.89 @ OutletPC
Motherboard Asus - TUF Z390M-PRO GAMING (WI-FI) Micro ATX LGA1151 Motherboard $176.00 @ B&H
Memory Corsair - Vengeance LPX 32 GB (2 x 16 GB) DDR4-3200 Memory $189.99 @ Newegg
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $149.99 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung - 860 Evo 1 TB 2.5" Solid State Drive $149.99 @ Amazon
Storage Samsung - 970 Evo 1 TB M.2-2280 Solid State Drive $263.59 @ OutletPC
Video Card Asus - GeForce RTX 2080 8 GB ROG Strix Gaming OC Video Card $769.99 @ Newegg
Case NZXT - H400 (White) MicroATX Mini Tower Case $83.72 @ Amazon
Power Supply Corsair - 760 W 80+ Platinum Certified Fully Modular ATX Power Supply $179.99 @ Amazon
Monitor Asus - PG279Q ROG Swift 27.0" 2560x1440 165 Hz Monitor $649.99 @ Walmart
Prices include shipping, taxes, rebates, and discounts
Total (before mail-in rebates) $3283.13
Mail-in rebates -$30.00
Total $3253.13
Generated by PCPartPicker 2019-05-09 18:03 EDT-0400
edit: formatting
submitted by drettypope to buildapc [link] [comments]

Some of my alternative results

I’ll go where the better returns are. I’ve mined big pools, small pools, Vertcoin one click, WinMiner, Cuba, ccminer, cpuminer, guiminer, ethminer and most of them suck. Either the set up is trash and there’s no info on what is needed for it to run, or the UI is atrocious.
NiceHash was simple- point and shoot. On top of that, it yielded good returns. WinMiner so far is the closest thing. CPU pointed at SUMO and GPUs pointed at VTC, it’s pulling roughly $5 a day. I also like that I can cash out in BTC, PayPal, or Vertcoin.
Slush pool yielded like, 0.01 after 24 hours Noobpool yielded 0.00 Give-me-coins VTC yielded 0.02 after like, 30 hours. Vertcoin one click might be okay if your pool doesn’t suck, but almost all the pools I found, did in fact suck.
Oh, I also briefly mined LBRY and got some very high hash rates and the currency started stacking up, but the currency is very very cheap, so the number of coins you get skyrockets, but it still equates to < $1
So, as of now, WinMiner is the only option that doesn’t suck.
GPU: GeForce 1070 ti CPU: I7 8700K 3.70ghz
Update: I gave AwesomeMiner a shot. I created the miner so it was automated and all I had to provide was my bitcoin address - then run it. It’s currently mining Nist5 from zpool and estimating $8/day
Some issues I’m currently working on with AwesomeMiner: It’s running my GPU fine, but configuring the CPU takes a little more time. I also have a MSI GT70 laptop with a Nvidia 870m that isn’t able to run the ccminer2.2.2 because it uses Cuda9, so trying to find a work around for that.
submitted by UncleTouchy1337 to NiceHash [link] [comments]

Console gaming is hardly different from PC gaming, and much of what people say about PC gaming to put it above console gaming is often wrong.

I’m not sure about you, but for the past few years, I’ve been hearing people go on and on about PCs "superiority" to the console market. People cite various reasons why they believe gaming on a PC is “objectively” better than console gaming, often for reasons related to power, costs, ease-of-use, and freedom.
…Only problem: much of what they say is wrong.
There are many misconceptions being thrown about PC gaming vs Console gaming, that I believe need to be addressed. This isn’t about “PC gamers being wrong,” or “consoles being the best,” absolutely not. I just want to cut through some of the stuff people use to put down console gaming, and show that console gaming is incredibly similar to PC gaming. I mean, yes, this is someone who mainly games on console, but I also am getting a new PC that I will game on as well, not to mention the 30 PC games I already own and play. I’m not particularly partial to one over the other.
Now I will mainly be focusing on the PlayStation side of the consoles, because I know it best, but much of what I say will apply to Xbox as well. Just because I don’t point out many specific Xbox examples, doesn’t mean that they aren’t out there.

“PCs can use TVs and monitors.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is the implication of one, and overall just… confusing. This is in some articles and the pcmasterrace “why choose a PC” section, where they’re practically implying that consoles can’t do this. I mean, yes, as long as the ports of your PC match up with your screen(s) inputs, you could plug a PC into either… but you could do the same with a console, again, as long as the ports match up.
I’m guessing the idea here is that gaming monitors often use Displayport, as do most dedicated GPUs, and consoles are generally restricted to HDMI… But even so, monitors often have HDMI ports. In fact, PC Magazine has just released their list of the best gaming monitors of 2017, and every single one of them has an HDMI port. A PS4 can be plugged into these just as easily as a GTX 1080.
I mean, even if the monitoTV doesn’t have HDMI or AV to connect with your console, just use an adaptor. If you have a PC with ports that doesn’t match your monitoTV… use an adapter. I don’t know what the point of this argument is, but it’s made a worrying amount of times.

“On PC, you have a wide range of controller options, but on console you’re stuck with the standard controller."

Are you on PlayStation and wish you could use a specific type of controller that suits your favorite kind of gameplay? Despite what some may believe, you have just as many options as PC.
Want to play fighting games with a classic arcade-style board, featuring the buttons and joystick? Here you go!
Want to get serious about racing and get something more accurate and immersive than a controller? Got you covered.
Absolutely crazy about flying games and, like the racers, want something better than a controller? Enjoy!
Want Wii-style motion controls? Been around since the PS3. If you prefer the form factor of the Xbox One controller but you own a PS4, Hori’s got you covered. And of course, if keyboard and mouse it what keeps you on PC, there’s a PlayStation compatible solution for that. Want to use the keyboard and mouse that you already own? Where there’s a will, there’s a way.
Of course, these aren’t isolated examples, there are plenty of options for each of these kind of controllers. You don’t have to be on PC to enjoy alternate controllers.

“On PC you could use Steam Link to play anywhere in your house and share games with others.”

PS4 Remote play app on PC/Mac, PSTV, and PS Vita.
PS Family Sharing.
Using the same PSN account on multiple PS4s/Xbox Ones and PS3s/360s, or using multiple accounts on the same console.
In fact, if multiple users are on the same PS4, only one has to buy the game for both users to play it on that one PS4. On top of that, only one of them has to have PS Plus for both to play online (if the one with PS Plus registers the PS4 as their main system).
PS4 Share Play; if two people on separate PS4s want to play a game together that only one of them owns, they can join a Party and the owner of the game can have their friend play with them in the game.
Need I say more?

“Gaming is more expensive on console.”

Part one, the Software
This is one that I find… genuinely surprising. There’s been a few times I’ve mentioned that part of the reason I chose a PS4 is for budget gaming, only to told that “games are cheaper on Steam.” To be fair, there are a few games on PSN/XBL that are more expensive than they are on Steam, so I can see how someone could believe this… but apparently they forgot about disks.
Dirt Rally, a hardcore racing sim game that’s… still $60 on all 3 platforms digitally… even though its successor is out.
So does this mean you have to pay full retail for this racing experience? Nope, because disk prices.
Just Cause 3, an insane open-world experience that could essentially be summed up as “break stuff, screw physics.” And it’s a good example of where the Steam price is lower than PSN and XBL:
Not by much, but still cheaper on Steam, so cheaper on PC… Until you look at the disk prices.
See my point? Often times the game is cheaper on console because of the disk alternative that’s available for practically every console-available game. Even when the game is brand new.
Dirt 4 - Remember that Dirt Rally successor I mentioned?
Yes, you could either buy this relatively new game digitally for $60, or just pick up the disk for a discounted price. And again, this is for a game that came out 2 months ago, and even it’s predecessor’s digital cost is locked at $60. Of course, I’m not going to ignore the fact that Dirt 4 is currently (as of writing this) discounted on Steam, but on PSN it also happens to be discounted for about the same amount.
Part 2: the Subscription
Now… let’s not ignore the elephant in the room: PS Plus and Xbox Gold. Now these would be ignorable, if they weren’t required for online play (on the PlayStation side, it’s only required for PS4, but still). So yes, it’s still something that will be included in the cost of your PS4 or Xbox One/360, assuming you play online. Bummer, right?
Here’s the thing, although that’s the case, although you have to factor in this $60 cost with your console, you can make it balance out, at worst, and make it work out for you as a budget gamer, at best. As nice as it would be to not have to deal with the price if you don’t want to, it’s not like it’s a problem if you use it correctly.
Imagine going to a new restaurant. This restaurant has some meals that you can’t get anywhere else, and fair prices compared to competitors. Only problem: you have to pay a membership fee to have the sides. Now you can have the main course, sit down and enjoy your steak or pasta, but if you want to have a side to have a full meal, you have to pay an annual fee.
Sounds shitty, right? But here’s the thing: not only does this membership allow you to have sides with your meal, but it also allows you to eat two meals for free every month, and also gives you exclusive discounts for other meals, drinks, and desserts.
Let’s look at PS Plus for a minute: for $60 per year, you get:
  • 2 free PS4 games, every month
  • 2 free PS3 games, every month
  • 1 PS4/PS3 and Vita compatible game, and 1 Vita-only game, every month
  • Exclusive/Extended discounts, especially during the weekly/seasonal sales (though you don’t need PS Plus to get sales, PS Plus members get to enjoy the best sales)
  • access to online multiplayer
So yes, you’re paying extra because of that membership, but what you get with that deal pays for it and then some. In fact, let’s ignore the discounts for a minute: you get 24 free PS4 games, 24 free PS3 games, and 12 Vita only + 12 Vita compatible games, up to 72 free games every year. Even if you only one of these consoles, that’s still 24 free games a year. Sure, maybe you get games for the month that you don’t like, then just wait until next month.
In fact, let’s look at Just Cause 3 again. It was free for PS Plus members in August, which is a pretty big deal. Why is this significant? Because it’s, again, a $60 digital game. That means with this one download, you’ve balanced out your $60 annual fee. Meaning? Every free game after that is money saved, every discount after that is money saved. And this is a trend: every year, PS Plus will release a game that balances out the entire service cost, then another 23 more that will only add icing to that budget cake. Though, you could just count games as paying off PS Plus until you hit $60 in savings, but still.
All in all, PS Plus, and Xbox Gold which offers similar options, saves you money. On top of that, again, you don't need to have these to get discounts, but with these memberships, you get more discounts.
Now, I’ve seen a few Steam games go up for free for a week, but what about being free for an entire month? Not to mention that; even if you want to talk about Steam Summer Sales, what about the PSN summer sale, or again, disc sale discounts? Now a lot of research and math would be needed to see if every console gamer would save money compared to every Steam gamer for the same games, but at the very least? The costs will balance out, at worst.
Part 3, the Systems
  • Xbox and PS2: $299
  • Xbox 360 and PS3: $299 and $499, respectively
  • Xbox One and PS4: $499 and $399, respectively.
Rounded up a few dollars, that’s $1,000 - $1,300 in day-one consoles, just to keep up with the games! Crazy right? So called budget systems, such a rip-off.
Well, keep in mind that the generations here aren’t short.
The 6th generation, from the launch of the PS2 to the launch of the next generation consoles, lasted 5 years, 6 years based on the launch of the PS3 (though you could say it was 9 or 14, since the Xbox wasn’t discontinued until 2009, and the PS2 was supported all the way to 2014, a year after the PS4 was released). The 7th gen lasted 7 - 8 years, again depending on whether you count the launch of the Xbox 360 to PS3. The 8th gen so far has lasted 4 years. That’s 17 years that the console money is spread over. If you had a Netflix subscription for it’s original $8 monthly plan for that amount of time, that would be over $1,600 total.
And let’s be fair here, just like you could upgrade your PC hardware whenever you wanted, you didn’t have to get a console from launch. Let’s look at PlayStation again for example: In 2002, only two years after its release, the PS2 retail price was cut from $300 to $200. The PS3 Slim, released 3 years after the original, was $300, $100-$200 lower than the retail cost. The PS4? You could’ve either gotten the Uncharted bundle for $350, or one of the PS4 Slim bundles for $250. This all brings it down to $750 - $850, which again, is spread over a decade and a half. This isn’t even counting used consoles, sales, or the further price cuts that I didn’t mention.
Even if that still sounds like a lot of money to you, even if you’re laughing at the thought of buying new systems every several years, because your PC “is never obsolete,” tell me: how many parts have you changed out in your PC over the years? How many GPUs have you been through? CPUs? Motherboards? RAM sticks, monitors, keyboards, mice, CPU coolers, hard drives— that adds up. You don’t need to replace your entire system to spend a lot of money on hardware.
Even if you weren’t upgrading for the sake of upgrading, I’d be amazed if the hardware you’ve been pushing by gaming would last for about 1/3 of that 17 year period. Computer parts aren’t designed to last forever, and really won’t when you’re pushing them with intensive gaming for hours upon hours. Generally speaking, your components might last you 6-8 years, if you’ve got the high-end stuff. But let’s assume you bought a system 17 years ago that was a beast for it’s time, something so powerful, that even if it’s parts have degraded over time, it’s still going strong. Problem is: you will have to upgrade something eventually.
Even if you’ve managed to get this far into the gaming realm with the same 17 year old hardware, I’m betting you didn’t do it with a 17 year Operating System. How much did Windows 7 cost you? Or 8.1? Or 10? Oh, and don’t think you can skirt the cost by getting a pre-built system, the cost of Windows is embedded into the cost of the machine (why else would Microsoft allow their OS to go on so many machines).
Sure, Windows 10 was a free upgrade for a year, but that’s only half of it’s lifetime— You can’t get it for free now, and not for the past year. On top of that, the free period was an upgrade; you had to pay for 7 or 8 first anyway.
Point is, as much as one would like to say that they didn’t need to buy a new system every so often for the sake of gaming, that doesn’t mean they haven’t been paying for hardware, and even if they’ve only been PC gaming recently, you’ll be spending money on hardware soon enough.

“PC is leading the VR—“

Let me stop you right there.
If you add together the total number of Oculus Rifts and HTC Vives sold to this day, and threw in another 100,000 just for the sake of it, that number would still be under the number of PSVR headsets sold.
Why could this possibly be? Well, for a simple reason: affordability. The systems needed to run the PC headsets costs $800+, and the headsets are $500 - $600, when discounted. PSVR on the other hand costs $450 for the full bundle (headset, camera, and move controllers, with a demo disc thrown in), and can be played on either a $250 - $300 console, or a $400 console, the latter recommended. Even if you want to say that the Vive and Rift are more refined, a full PSVR set, system and all, could cost just over $100 more than a Vive headset alone.
If anything, PC isn’t leading the VR gaming market, the PS4 is. It’s the system bringing VR to the most consumers, showing them what the future of gaming could look like. Not to mention that as the PlayStation line grows more powerful (4.2 TFLOP PS4 Pro, 10 TFLOP “PS5…”), it won’t be long until the PlayStation line can use the same VR games as PC.
Either way, this shows that there is a console equivalent to the PC VR options. Sure, there are some games you'd only be able to play on PC, but there are also some games you'd only be able to play on PSVR.
…Though to be fair, if we’re talking about VR in general, these headsets don’t even hold a candle to, surprisingly, Gear VR.

“If it wasn’t for consoles holding devs back, then they would be able to make higher quality games.”

This one is based on the idea that because of how “low spec” consoles are, that when a developer has to take them in mind, then they can’t design the game to be nearly as good as it would be otherwise. I mean, have you ever seen the minimum specs for games on Steam?
GTA V
  • CPU: Intel Core 2 Quad CPU Q6600 @ 2.40GHz (4 CPUs) / AMD Phenom 9850 Quad-Core Processor (4 CPUs) @ 2.5GHz
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA 9800 GT 1GB / AMD HD 4870 1GB (DX 10, 10.1, 11)
Just Cause 3
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2500k, 3.3GHz / AMD Phenom II X6 1075T 3GHz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GeForce GTX 670 (2GB) / AMD Radeon HD 7870 (2GB)
Fallout 4
  • CPU: Intel Core i5-2300 2.8 GHz/AMD Phenom II X4 945 3.0 GHz or equivalent
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA GTX 550 Ti 2GB/AMD Radeon HD 7870 2GB or equivalent
Overwatch
  • CPU: Intel Core i3 or AMD Phenom™ X3 8650
  • Memory: 4 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVIDIA® GeForce® GTX 460, ATI Radeon™ HD 4850, or Intel® HD Graphics 4400
Witcher 3
  • Processor: Intel CPU Core i5-2500K 3.3GHz / AMD CPU Phenom II X4 940
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • Graphics: Nvidia GPU GeForce GTX 660 / AMD GPU Radeon HD 7870
Actually, bump up all the memory requirements to 8 GBs, and those are some decent specs, relatively speaking. And keep in mind these are the minimum specs to even open the games. It’s almost as if the devs didn’t worry about console specs when making a PC version of the game, because this version of the game isn’t on console. Or maybe even that the consoles aren’t holding the games back that much because they’re not that weak. Just a hypothesis.
But I mean, the devs are still ooobviously having to take weak consoles into mind right? They could make their games sooo much more powerful if they were PC only, right? Right?
No. Not even close.
iRacing
  • CPU: Intel Core i3, i5, i7 or better or AMD Bulldozer or better
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • GPU: NVidia GeForce 2xx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory / AMD 5xxx series or better, 1GB+ dedicated video memory
Playerunknown’s Battlegrounds
  • CPU: Intel Core i3-4340 / AMD FX-6300
  • Memory: 6 GB RAM
  • GPU: nVidia GeForce GTX 660 2GB / AMD Radeon HD 7850 2GB
These are PC only games. That’s right, no consoles to hold them back, they don’t have to worry about whether an Xbox One could handle it. Yet, they don’t require anything more than the Multiplatform games.
Subnautica
  • CPU: Intel Haswell 2 cores / 4 threads @ 2.5Ghz or equivalent
  • Memory: 4GB
  • GPU: Intel HD 4600 or equivalent - This includes most GPUs scoring greater than 950pts in the 3DMark Fire Strike benchmark
Rust
  • CPU: 2 ghz
  • Memory: 8 GB RAM
  • DirectX: Version 11 (they don’t even list a GPU)
So what’s the deal? Theoretically, if developers don’t have to worry about console specs, then why aren’t they going all-out and making games that no console could even dream of supporting?
Low-end PCs.
What, did you think people only game on Steam if they spent at least $500 on gaming hardware? Not all PC gamers have gaming-PC specs, and if devs close their games out to players who don’t have the strongest of PCs, then they’d be losing out on a pretty sizable chunk of their potential buyers.
Saying “devs having to deal with consoles is holding gaming back” is like saying “racing teams having to deal with Ford is holding GT racing back.” A: racing teams don’t have to deal with Ford if they don’t want to, which is probably why many of them don’t, and B: even though Ford doesn’t make the fastest cars overall, they still manage to make cars that are awesome on their own, they don’t even need to be compared to anything else to know that they make good cars.
I want to go back to that previous point though, developers having to deal with low-end PCs, because it’s integral to the next point:

“PCs are more powerful, gaming on PC provides a better experience.”

This one isn’t so much of a misconception as it is… misleading.
Did you know that according to the Steam Hardware & Software Survey (July 2017) , the percentage of Steam gamers who use a GPU that's less powerful than that of a PS4 Slim’s GPU is well over 50%? Things get dismal when compared to the PS4 Pro (Or Xbox One X). On top of that, the percentage of PC gamers who own a Nvidia 10 series card is about 20% (about 15% for the 1060, 1080 and 1070 owners).
Now to be fair, the large majority of gamers have CPUs with considerably high clock speeds, which is the main factor in CPU gaming performance. But, the number of Steam gamers with as much RAM or more than a PS4 or Xbox One is less than 50%, which can really bottleneck what those CPUs can handle.
These numbers are hardly better than they were in 2013, all things considered. Sure, a PS3/360 weeps in the face of even a $400 PC, but in this day in age, consoles have definitely caught up.
Sure, we could mention the fact that even 1% of Steam accounts represents over 1 million accounts, but that doesn’t really matter compared to the 10s of millions of 8th gen consoles sold; looking at it that way, sure the number of Nvidia 10 series owners is over 20 million, but that ignores the fact that there are over 5 times more 8th gen consoles sold than that.
Basically, even though PCs run on a spectrum, saying they're more powerful “on average” is actually wrong. Sure, they have the potential for being more powerful, but most of the time, people aren’t willing to pay the premium to reach those extra bits of performance.
Now why is this important? What matters are the people who spent the premium cost for premium parts, right? Because of the previous point: PCs don’t have some ubiquitous quality over the consoles, developers will always have to keep low-end PCs in mind, because not even half of all PC players can afford the good stuff, and you have to look at the top quarter of Steam players before you get to PS4-Pro-level specs. If every Steam player were to get a PS4 Pro, it would be an upgrade for over 60% of them, and 70% of them would be getting an upgrade with the Xbox One X.
Sure, you could still make the argument that when you pay more for PC parts, you get a better experience than you could with a console. We can argue all day about budget PCs, but a console can’t match up to a $1,000 PC build. It’s the same as paying more for car parts, in the end you get a better car. However, there is a certain problem with that…

“You pay a little more for a PC, you get much more quality.”

The idea here is that the more you pay for PC parts, the performance increases at a faster rate than the price does. Problem: that’s not how technology works. Paying twice as much doesn’t get you twice the quality the majority of the time.
For example, let’s look at graphics cards, specifically the GeForce 10 series cards, starting with the GTX 1050.
  • 1.8 TFLOP
  • 1.35 GHz base clock
  • 2 GB VRAM
  • $110
This is our reference, our basis of comparison. Any percentages will be based on the 1050’s specs.
Now let’s look at the GTX 1050 Ti, the 1050’s older brother.
  • 2.1 TFLOP
  • 1.29 GHz base clock
  • 4 GB VRAM
  • $140 retail
This is pretty good. You only increase the price by about 27%, and you get an 11% increase in floating point speed and a 100% increase (double) in VRAM. Sure you get a slightly lower base clock, but the rest definitely makes up for it. In fact, according to GPU boss, the Ti managed 66 fps, or a 22% increase in frame rate for Battlefield 4, and a 54% increase in mHash/second in bitcoin mining. The cost increase is worth it, for the most part.
But let’s get to the real meat of it; what happens when we double our budget? Surely we should see a massive increase performance, I bet some of you are willing to bet that twice the cost means more than twice the performance.
The closest price comparison for double the cost is the GTX 1060 (3 GB), so let’s get a look at that.
  • 3.0 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 3 GB VRAM
  • $200 retail
Well… not substantial, I’d say. About a 50% increase in floating point speed, an 11% increase in base clock speed, and a 1GB decrease in VRAM. For [almost] doubling the price, you don’t get much.
Well surely raw specs don’t tell the full story, right? Well, let’s look at some real wold comparisons. Once again, according to GPU Boss, there’s a 138% increase in hashes/second for bitcoin mining, and at 99 fps, an 83% frame rate increase in Battlefield 4. Well, then, raw specs does not tell the whole story!
Here’s another one, the 1060’s big brother… or, well, slightly-more-developed twin.
  • 3.9 TFLOP
  • 1.5 GHz base clock
  • 6 GB VRAM
  • $250 retail
Seems reasonable, another $50 for a decent jump in power and double the memory! But, as we’ve learned, we shouldn’t look at the specs for the full story.
I did do a GPU Boss comparison, but for the BF4 frame rate, I had to look at Tom’s Hardware (sorry miners, GPU boss didn’t cover the mHash/sec spec either). What’s the verdict? Well, pretty good, I’d say. With 97 FPS, a 79% increase over the 1050— wait. 97? That seems too low… I mean, the 3GB version got 99.
Well, let’s see what Tech Power Up has to say...
94.3 fps. 74% increase. Huh.
Alright alright, maybe that was just a dud. We can gloss over that I guess. Ok, one more, but let’s go for the big fish: the GTX 1080.
  • 9.0 TFLOP
  • 1.6 GHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $500 retail
That jump in floating point speed definitely has to be something, and 4 times the VRAM? Sure it’s 5 times the price, but as we saw, raw power doesn’t always tell the full story. GPU Boss returns to give us the run down, how do these cards compare in the real world?
Well… a 222% (over three-fold) increase in mHash speed, and a 218% increase in FPS for Battlefield 4. That’s right, for 5 times the cost, you get 3 times the performance. Truly, the raw specs don’t tell the full story.
You increase the cost by 27%, you increase frame rate in our example game by 22%. You increase the cost by 83%, you increase the frame rate by 83%. Sounds good, but if you increase the cost by 129%, and you get a 79% (-50% cost/power increase) increase in frame rate. You increase it by 358%, and you increase the frame rate by 218% (-140% cost/power increase). That’s not paying “more for much more power,” that’s a steep drop-off after the third cheapest option.
In fact, did you know that you have to get to the 1060 (6GB) before you could compare the GTX line to a PS4 Pro? Not to mention that at $250, the price of a 1060 (6GB) you could get an entire PS4 Slim bundle, or that you have to get to the 1070 before you beat the Xbox One X.
On another note, let’s look at a PS4 Slim…
  • 1.84 TFLOP
  • 800 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $300 retail
…Versus a PS4 Pro.
  • 4.2 TFLOP
  • 911 MHz base clock
  • 8 GB VRAM
  • $400 retail
128% increase in floating point speed, 13% increase in clock speed, for a 25% difference in cost. Unfortunately there is no Battlefield 4 comparison to make, but in BF1, the frame rate is doubled (30 fps to 60) and the textures are taken to 11. For what that looks like, I’ll leave it up to this bloke. Not to even mention that you can even get the texture buffs in 4K. Just like how you get a decent increase in performance based on price for the lower-cost GPUs, the same applies here.
It’s even worse when you look at the CPU for a gaming PC. The more money you spend, again, the less of a benefit you get per dollar. Hardware Unboxed covers this in a video comparing different levels of Intel CPUs. One thing to note is that the highest i7 option (6700K) in this video was almost always within 10 FPS (though for a few games, 15 FPS) of a certain CPU in that list for just about all of the games.
…That CPU was the lowest i3 (6100) option. The lowest i3 was $117 and the highest i7 was $339, a 189% price difference for what was, on average, a 30% or less difference in frame rate. Even the lowest Pentium option (G4400, $63) was often able to keep up with the i7.
The CPU and GPU are usually the most expensive and power-consuming parts of a build, which is why I focused on them (other than the fact that they’re the two most important parts of a gaming PC, outside of RAM). With both, this “pay more to get much more performance” idea is pretty much the inverse of the truth.

“The console giants are bad for game developers, Steam doesn't treat developers as bad as Microsoft or especially Sony.”

Now one thing you might’ve heard is that the PS3 was incredibly difficult for developers to make games for, which for some, fueled the idea that console hardware is difficult too develop on compared to PC… but this ignores a very basic idea that we’ve already touched on: if the devs don’t want to make the game compatible with a system, they don’t have to. In fact, this is why Left 4 Dead and other Valve games aren’t on PS3, because they didn’t want to work with it’s hardware, calling it “too complex.” This didn’t stop the game from selling well over 10 million units worldwide. If anything, this was a problem for the PS3, not the dev team.
This also ignores that games like LittleBigPlanet, Grand Theft Auto IV, and Metal Gear Solid 4 all came out in the same year as Left 4 Dead (2008) on PS3. Apparently, plenty of other dev teams didn’t have much of a problem with the PS3’s hardware, or at the very least, they got used to it soon enough.
On top of that, when developing the 8th gen consoles, both Sony and Microsoft sought to use CPUs that were easier for developers, which included making decisions that considered apps for the consoles’ usage for more than gaming. On top of that, using their single-chip proprietary CPUs is cheaper and more energy efficient than buying pre-made CPUs and boards, which is far better of a reason for using them than some conspiracy about Sony and MS trying to make devs' lives harder.
Now, console exclusives are apparently a point of contention: it’s often said that exclusive can cause developers to go bankrupt. However, exclusivity doesn’t have to be a bad thing for the developer. For example, when Media Molecule had to pitch their game to a publisher (Sony, coincidentally), they didn’t end up being tied into something detrimental to them.
Their initial funding lasted for 6 months. From then, Sony offered additional funding, in exchange for Console Exclusivity. This may sound concerning to some, but the game ended up going on to sell almost 6 million units worldwide and launched Media Molecule into the gaming limelight. Sony later bought the development studio, but 1: this was in 2010, two years after LittleBigPlanet’s release, and 2: Media Molecule seem pretty happy about it to this day. If anything, signing up with Sony was one of the best things they could’ve done, in their opinion.
Does this sound like a company that has it out for developers? There are plenty of examples that people will use to put Valve in a good light, but even Sony is comparatively good to developers.

“There are more PC gamers.”

The total number of active PC gamers on Steam has surpassed 120 million, which is impressive, especially considering that this number is double that of 2013’s figure (65 million). But the number of monthly active users on Xbox Live and PSN? About 120 million (1, 2) total. EDIT: You could argue that this isn't an apples-to-apples comparison, sure, so if you want to, say, compare the monthly number of Steam users to console? Steam has about half of what consoles do, at 67 million.
Now, back to the 65 million total user figure for Steam, the best I could find for reference for PlayStation's number was an article giving the number of registered PSN accounts in 2013, 150 million. In a similar 4-year period (2009 - 2013), the number of registered PSN accounts didn’t double, it sextupled, or increased by 6 fold. Considering how the PS4 is already at 2/3 of the number of sales the PS3 had, even though it’s currently 3 years younger than its predecessor, I’m sure this trend is at least generally consistent.
For example, let’s look at DOOM 2016, an awesome faced-paced shooting title with graphics galore… Of course, on a single platform, it sold best on PC/Steam. 2.36 million Steam sales, 2.05 million PS4 sales, 1.01 million Xbox One sales.
But keep in mind… when you add the consoles sales together, you get over 3 million sales on the 8th gen systems. Meaning: this game was best sold on console. In fact, the Steam sales have only recently surpassed the PS4 sales. By the way VG charts only shows sales for physical copies of the games, so the number of PS4 and Xbox sales, when digital sales are included, are even higher than 3 million.
This isn’t uncommon, by the way.
Even with the games were the PC sales are higher than either of the consoles, there generally are more console sales total. But, to be fair, this isn’t anything new. The number of PC gamers hasn’t dominated the market, the percentages have always been about this much. PC can end up being the largest single platform for games, but consoles usually sell more copies total.
EDIT: There were other examples but... Reddit has a 40,000-character limit.

"Modding is only on PC."

Xbox One is already working on it, and Bethesda is helping with that.
PS4 isn't far behind either. You could argue that these are what would be the beta stages of modding, but that just means modding on consoles will only grow.

What’s the Point?

This isn’t to say that there’s anything wrong with PC gaming, and this isn’t to exalt consoles. I’m not here to be the hipster defending the little guy, nor to be the one to try to put down someone/thing out of spite. This is about showing that PCs and consoles are overall pretty similar because there isn’t much dividing them, and that there isn’t anything wrong with being a console gamer. There isn’t some chasm separating consoles and PCs, at the end of the day they’re both computers that are (generally) designed for gaming. This about unity as gamers, to try to show that there shouldn’t be a massive divide just because of the computer system you game on. I want gamers to be in an environment where specs don't separate us; whether you got a $250 PS4 Slim or just built a $2,500 gaming PC, we’re here to game and should be able to have healthy interactions regardless of your platform.
I’m well aware that this isn’t going to fix… much, but this needs to be said: there isn’t a huge divide between the PC and consoles, they’re far more similar than people think. There are upsides and downsides that one has that the other doesn’t on both sides. There’s so much more I could touch on, like how you could use SSDs or 3.5 inch hard drives with both, or that even though PC part prices go down over time, so do consoles, but I just wanted to touch on the main points people try to use to needlessly separate the two kinds of systems (looking at you PCMR) and correct them, to get the point across.
I thank anyone who takes the time to read all of this, and especially anyone who doesn’t take what I say out of context. I also want to note that, again, this isn’tanti-PC gamer.” If it were up to me, everyone would be a hybrid gamer.
Cheers.
submitted by WhyyyCantWeBeFriends to unpopularopinion [link] [comments]

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